Grant News December 2017

Latest News

Save the Dates for Grant Seeking Professional Development Webinars!

New Year, New Forms: Revised UWL Grant/Contract Transmittal and Post Award Modifications Forms Effective Jan. 1

NSF Publishes FY2017 Financial Report

Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Takes on Social Isolation

NIH Stresses the Importance of Writing Project Outcomes for the General Public

Recent Submissions & Awards

UWL & UW System Grants

UWL Curricular Redesign Grants

UWL Foundation Carol Dobrunz Endowment Fund

UWL International Program Development Fund

UWL International Scholarship Grant

UWL Program Assessment Grant

UW System/WiSys Applied Research Grant & AR-Wi-TAG

External Grants

Grants listed below require the institutional GRC log-in to access. If you need the GRC log-in, please see the newsletter in your UWL inbox or contact ORSP.

Local/Regional Grants

American Association of University Women Educational Foundation
La Crosse Community Foundation
Wisconsin Humanities Council

Arts / Humanities / International

American Council of Learned Societies (humanities or social science digital projects)
American Historical Association
American Musicological Society
Arthur and Elizabeth Schlesinger Library on the History of Women
Association for Asian Studies
Chiang Ching-kuo Foundation (Chinese Studies grants)
Council for International Exchange of Scholars
Japan-United States Friendship Commission
Mary Baker Eddy Library
National Archives and Records Administration (NARA)
National Endowment for the Humanities
National Poetry Series
National Trust for Historic Preservation (Preservation/Education Projects)
Samuel H. Kress Foundation (Art history, conservation, and museums)
Truman (Harry S.) Library Institute for National and International Affairs
University of Edinburgh
Education/Economic and Community Development
Advertising Educational Foundation
American Educational Research Association (AERA)
American Institute for Economic Research
Calvin K. Kazanjian Economics Foundation, Inc.
Morris K. Udall Foundation
National Council of Teachers of English
National Education Association Foundation (Public education & educator grants)
National Endowment for the Arts
NCAA Foundation
President’s Commission on White House Fellowships
Retirement Research Foundation
Spencer Foundation (Education research)
US Department of Homeland Security
US Social Security Administration (retirement income and policy research)
VentureWell (membership required)
W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research
Health
Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality
Burroughs Wellcome Fund (Biomedical research support)
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Cystic Fibrosis Foundation
Elsa U. Pardee Foundation
Health Resources and Services Administration
Leukemia Research Foundation
National Athletic Trainers Association Research and Education Foundation
National Institutes of Health
Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI)

Eugene Washington PCORI Engagement Awards-Feb 1, 2018

Science/Technology/Engineering/Math

American Association for Laboratory Animal Science Foundation
Dreyfus Foundation (chemical sciences)
National Aeronautics and Space Administration
National Fish and Wildlife Foundation
National Research Council (basic & applied research in multiple STEM fields)
National Science Foundation
Smithsonian Institution
US Department of Agriculture
US Department of Commerce
US Department of Defense
US Department of Energy
US Department of the Interior
Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

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Latest News

Save the Dates for Grant Seeking Professional Development Webinars! 

In spring 2018, WiSys Regional Research Administrator Jeremy Miner (UW-Eau Claire) will be hosting five professional development webinars for UW System faculty and staff. Topics will span the continuum of grant seeking expertise, addressing the needs of novice as well as seasoned grant applicants. Sessions are each targeted to be 75 minutes total, with 60 minutes of presentation and 15 minutes for Q&A.

Dates and topics are provided below. The webinars will be hosted by ORSP in the Institute for Campus Excellence (150 Murphy Library).

Grant Seeking Webinars: Dates, Times, & Topics

  • February 1, 2:00 pm-3:15 pm: “Humanities and Social Sciences: Getting Funded, Getting Published”
  • February 8, 2:00 pm-3:15 pm: “Building a Believable Budget”
  • March 1, 2:00 pm-3:15 pm: “Funding Opportunities for Your Teaching, Research, and Scholarship”
  • March 8, 2:00 pm-3:15 pm: “Goals, Objectives and Outcomes: the “GOO” that Holds a Proposal Together”
  • April 5, 2:00 pm-3:15 pm: “½ Points: Making Your Grant Proposal Distinctively Different”


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New Year, New Forms: Revised UWL Grant/Contract Transmittal and Post Award Modifications Forms Effective January 1

Beginning January 1, significantly updated versions of two extramural funding forms (replacing four old forms) will take effect.

What’s new?

New Grant/Contract Transmittal Form
  • This form replaces two current forms: the UW System Grant Transmittal Form and the Grant/Contract Transmittal Form used for all other extramural funding. As with its predecessors, the form will be used to document the required institutional review and approval of all extramural funding (grants and sponsored research contracts), including UW System funding, prior to  proposal submission. The required signatures remain the same (PI and co-PIs, department chair(s)/unit director(s), dean(s)/division director(s), ORSP director).
New Post Award Modifications Form
  • This form replaces two current forms: the Budget Modification Form and No-Cost Extension Form. The new form will document the required institutional review and approval of the following post award modifications:
    • Budget modifications when total funding previously awarded is reduced or increased, significant revisions are needed (i.e., those requiring prior approval from the sponsor), or funds are reallocated from participant support
    • No-cost extensions
    • Award transfers from or to another institution
    • Changes to a project’s PI, scope, objectives, or personnel effort
    • Other modifications requiring a sponsor’s prior approval
New Post Award Modifications Procedures Online
  • To clarify which post award modifications require prior approval, and the process for obtaining approval, significantly updated procedures have been published on the ORSP website. The procedures themselves are not new, but the (hopefully) clearer guidance is.

Why?

The forms being replaced were first implemented over 15 years ago and have not been significantly updated since that time. The revisions ensure a) the forms, content, and processes are more comprehensible and uniform; and b) we are addressing the myriad compliance regulation revisions that have occurred over the past 1 1/2 decades.

While the forms have been updated, processes and requirements remain essentially the same. Please contact ORSP with any questions.

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NSF Publishes FY 2017 Financial Report

The National Science Foundation (NSF) recently published its fiscal year 2017 Agency Financial Report. Report highlights include the following:

  • $7.5 billion in appropriations
    • 80% ($6,006 million) supported basic research and education activities
    • 12% ($873 million) supported activities to ensure a diverse, competitive, globally engaged US STEM workforce
    • 5% ($359 million) supported NSF administrative and management activities
    • 3% ($215 million) supported major research equipment and facilities construction
    • <1% ($15 million) supported the Office of the Inspector General
    • 1% ($4 million) supported the National Science Board
  • 1,800 colleges, universities, and other institutions funded
    • 78% to colleges, universities, and academic consortia ($5,558 million)
    • 13% to private industry, including small businesses ($951 million)
    • 5% to federal, state, local governments, nonprofit organizations, and international organizations ($372 million)
    • 3% to federally funded research and development centers ($222 million)
  • 49,400 proposals evaluated through a competitive merit review process
  • 11,500 competitive awards funded
    • 73% grants ($5,211 million)
    • 22% cooperative agreements ($1,551 million)
    • 5% contracts ($341 million)
  • 203,400 proposal reviews conducted
  • 353,000 estimated number of people supported by NSF funds (this estimate includes researchers, postdoctoral fellows, trainees, teachers, and students)
  • 55,700 students supported by Graduate Research Fellowships since 1952

The full FY 2017 Financial Report, along with figures and tables, can be found at the NSF link below.

Source: National Science Foundation


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Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Takes on Social Isolation

A new funding opportunity from the Robert  Johnson Foundation (RWJF) seeks to address the growing problem of social isolation in America. RWJF is offering $2.5 million in awards to promote social connection as a way of promoting healthier overall lifestyles. Awards are expected to range from $250,000 to $750,000 to support projects lasting up to three years. Of particular interest are projects that adapt successful international programs in an American context. Both domestic and international institutions are eligible to apply for the grant, and partnerships are welcomed.

Social isolation has been linked to a host of health problems, increased rates of workplace hostility and addiction, and even decreased functionality of civic institutions. RWJF hopes that by increasing community connectivity, many negative consequences of isolation can be mitigated. Primarily, however, the project will be measuring health outcomes.

The request for proposals is part of a larger push by the RWJF to improve American health outcomes through their recently released Culture of Health Action Framework. Proposals will be expected to target the populations highlighted by the framework. Proposals must be submitted by December 21, 2017. The link to the full RFP can be found here.

Source: GRC GrantWeek


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NIH Stress the Importance of Writing Project Outcomes For the General Public

As of October 1, 2017, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) will be sharing project outcomes with the general public via NIH’s Research Portfolio Online Reporting Tool (RePORTER). Acccording to Dr. Michael Lauer, NIH Deputy Director for Extramural Research, “Reviewing reported outcomes is part of [NIH’s] stewardship of the public’s investment in research. Publicly posting grant outcomes provides transparency and lets the taxpayer understand what they have paid for.”

When writing your Project Outcomes for the Interim and Final Research Performance Progress Reports (RPPR), Lauer recommends keeping the descriptions clear and concise, with a focus on writing for a broad, general audience (e.g., clear and comprehensible language, avoid or explain jargon, etc.), as well as making sure not to share proprietary or confidential information or trade secrets. Even though NIH reviews the final RPPR or Interim RPPR for relevancy, they will publish the exact project outcomes provided by the grantee, so it is very important that it is intentionally written for the lay person.

In the full article, Lauer provides tips and examples on using plain language to communicate the value and significance of your research.

Source: NIH Extramural Nexus 

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Recent Submissions


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Recent Awards

recently-awarded2.png

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UWL & UW System Grants

UWL Curricular Redesign Grants

Program contact: UWL Center for Advancing Teaching & Learning (CATL)

Program summary: Curricular Redesign Grants support groups of instructors to develop or redesign and implement curricula and teaching practices in academic programs. The program funds projects that involve significant revisions intended to address challenging learning goals, student learning problems, and/or achievement gaps. Priority will be given to projects that go above and beyond normal curriculum development, course updates, and minor revisions. Projects should include design, assessment, and further improvement of curriculum and teaching practices.

Deadline: February 16, 2018

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UWL Foundation Carol Dobrunz Endowment Fund

Program contact: UWL Foundation 

Program summary: This fund supports conference costs for non-tenured faculty or instructional academic staff (IAS) without an indefinite appointment. The recipient must meet the following criteria: 1) must be employed at UWL with at least a 75 percent appointment; 2) must be either a non-tenured faculty member or a member of instructional academic staff without an indefinite appointment; 3) must be attending a national conference within her/his discipline; 4) may not have previously received this award.

Deadline: March 30, 2018

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UWL International Program Development Fund

Program contact: Rose Brougham (rbrougham@uwlax.edu)

Program summary: Through institutional partnerships and other scholarly activities, university faculty and academic staff are connected with other universities and organizations throughout the world. International experiences bring the world to the classroom, enhance research, and assist in preparing students, faculty, and staff in becoming global citizens for the 21st Century. The grant program focuses on the development of faculty- and staff-led programs (e.g., scoping visits) or faculty exchanges.

Deadline: February 5, 2018

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UWL International Scholarship Grant

rogram contact: UWL Provost Office

Program summary: The program supports internationalization of the university through research and other scholarly projects that are international in scope and have the potential to transform the applicant’s research. One of the primary outcomes associated with this program is the support of travel costs to present research at international venues. However, UWL employees may submit proposals associated with conducting scholarly endeavors abroad and/or enhancing their professional development in a manner that maximizes the interaction between faculty/staff and the host culture/community. Proposals must be approved by the department and dean and demonstrate that the university will realize tangible benefits.

Deadline: February 5, 2018

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UWL Program Assessment Grant

Program contact: Provost Office

Program summary: In an effort to support program assessment activities, this grant provides support for gathering, analyzing, discussing, and acting on evidence of student learning in programs. This program is intended to support evidence-informed improvement of teaching and learning in majors and concentrations. Awards may be used for expenses related to the development of assessment plans, collection of assessment data, or the review of assessment data and development of action steps based on results. No single course assessment proposals are eligible. The awards are for projects that will take place in the spring 2018 semester and be completed by June 1, 2018.

Deadline: February 2, 2018

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UW System/WiSys Applied Research Grant (ARG) & AR-WiTAG

Funding agencies: WiSys & UW System

Program summary: The Applied Research Grant (ARG) program encourages faculty and academic staff to apply their expertise and scholarship to the economic development of Wisconsin and further afield. Applied research activities improve the connection between knowledge and practice while promoting positive change in the state’s economy. Potential benefits of these activities include fostering business expansion and improving profitability, creating jobs and enhancing workforce quality, reducing costs and increasing efficiency, and improving the quality of Wisconsin’s products and services. Proposals are invited from faculty and staff in ALL academic disciplines, including the humanities and social sciences. Funding is available for one year to researchers at all UW institutions. For the humanities and social sciences, in addition to the benefits outline above, potential impact could be directed towards societal impact, quality of life, cultural or environmental impact, impact on health as well as public policy and services.

The Applied Research-WiSys Technology Grant (AR-WiTAG) program encourages faculty and academic staff from science and technology fields to apply their expertise and scholarship to the economic development of Wisconsin and further afield through the development of high-value intellectual property and/or marketable products. Projects that address a clear and unmet need from industry are strongly encouraged.

Deadlines:

  • Intent to submit email due December 18, 2017 (required) to both grants@wisys.org and afgp@uwsa.edu
  • Full proposal due to ORSP by January 12, 2018; due to WiSys by January 29, 2018

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Grants News, November 2017

Latest News

NSF Major Research Instrumentation Program (MRI): UWL Notices of Interest Due Nov. 10 

Gates Foundation Announces Increase in Education Funding 

NIH Releases $169 Million for BRAIN Initiative Awards

NSF Drops Pre-proposals & Deadlines for Most Programs in the Biology Directorate

FY 2017-18 First Quarter Awards: A Pictorial Overview

Recent Submissions & Awards

UWL & UW System Grants

UWL Foundation Carol Dobrunz Endowment Fund

UWL Curricular Redesign Grants 

UWL International Program Development Fund

UWL International Scholarship Grant

UWL Visiting Scholar/Artist of Color

UW System/WiSys Applied Research Grant & AR-Wi-TAG

External Grants

Grants listed below require the institutional GRC log-in to access. If you need the GRC log-in, please see the newsletter in your UWL inbox or contact ORSP.

Local/Regional Grants

American Association of University Women Educational Foundation
La Crosse Community Foundation
Wisconsin Humanities Council

Arts / Humanities / International

American Musicological Society
Blakemore Foundation
Chiang Ching-kuo Foundation (Chinese Studies grants)
Houghton Library
Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS)
Longview Foundation
Education/Economic and Community Development
American Educational Research Association (AERA)
American Political Science Association
Morris K. Udall Foundation
National Council of Teachers of English
US Social Security Administration (retirement income and policy research)
Health
Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ)
American Federation for Aging Research (AFAR)
American Gastroenterological Association (AGA) Research Foundation
American Psychological Association (APA)
Cystic Fibrosis Foundation
Doris Duke Charitable Foundation
Gerber Foundation (nutrition-related interventions to improve infant health and development)
James McKeen Cattell Fund
McKnight Endowment Fund for Neuroscience
National Institutes of Health

Science/Technology/Engineering/Math

American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS)
American Astronomical Society
American Museum of Natural History
American Statistical Association
Association of American Geographers
AT&T Labs
Environmental Research & Education Foundation
Leakey (L.S.B.) Foundation (research on human origins and evolution)
National Science Foundation (NSF)
U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA)
U.S. Department of Commerce (DOC)
Ernest F. Hollings Undergraduate Scholarship Program-Jan 31, 2018  (efforts to increase undergraduate training)
U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)
U.S.-Israel Binational Science Foundation (BSF)
Whitehall Foundation (basic research in vertebrate and invertebrate neurobiology)

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Latest News

NSF Major Research Instrumentation Program (MRI): UWL Notices of Interest Due Nov. 10

The NSF MRI program serves to increase access to shared scientific and engineering instruments for research and research training in higher education, not-for-profit museums, science centers, and scientific/engineering research organizations. It supports acquisition of instrumentation that aids research and research training goals and that may be used by other researchers regionally or nationally. Each MRI proposal may request support for the acquisition (Track 1) or development (Track 2) of a single research instrument for shared inter- and/or intra-organizational use.

NSF limits the number of MRI applications each institution may submit; thus, interested UWL faculty/staff should submit a brief (i.e., up to one-page) notice of interest (NOI) via email to grants@uwlax.edu by November 10. NOIs should include the following information:

  1. Indication of whether MRI application would be Track 1 (acquisition) or Track 2 (development)
  2. Summary of the need for the equipment that would be acquired or developed
  3. List of the internal and/or external collaborators that would be involved in the application and their respective roles (e.g., responsibilities for equipment training and/or maintenance, how equipment would be used by respective collaborators)

Submit NOIs to grants@uwlax.edu; include your department chair and college dean in the CC line. The UWL Office of Research & Sponsored Programs (ORSP) will facilitate review of NOIs and will notify faculty/staff invited to submit full applications shortly thereafter. Please contact ORSP (grants@uwlax.edu) with questions.

Deadlines:

  • Required UWL notices of intent (NOIs) are due to grants@uwlax.edu by November 10, 2017.
  • Full applications are due to NSF during the submission window: January 29-February 5, 2018 (annually recurring).

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Gates Foundation Announces Increase in Education Funding  

The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation has announced it anticipates investing $1.7 billion in US public education over the next five years. The announcement was delivered by Bill Gates in Cleveland on October 19 at the Council of Great City Schools. This represents a significant increase in spending in this area, which totaled $1 billion over the last 17 years.

A majority of this funding (60 percent) is expected to support curriculum development, school network development to promote local problem solving, and data collection to signal avenues of improvement. A further 25 percent of the funding will be reserved for “big bets” with the potential to significantly affect public education nationwide, particularly technological solutions to current problems. The last 15 percent of the funding will be spent in the charter sector, particularly on improved outcomes for special needs students.

The emphasis for all funding projects will be local flexibility–the recognition that each region, state, city, district, or even school requires a unique blend of methods and tools to achieve success. The foundation’s purpose will be to vet tools, generate them, make them available for use, and gather and share data on the outcomes.

The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation hopes to attract as partners other funding entities with more focused projects, such as a particular region or methodology. Several of the past projects highlighted by Gates in his remarks included partnerships between public schools and institutions of higher learning, mostly with the goal of increasing the college participation rate. Whether similar programs will be formalized under this new round of funding has yet to be announced.

Sources: GRC Grantweek and The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation 

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NIH Releases $169 Million for BRAIN Initiative Awards

NIH recently announced $169 million in funding to advance research in the Brain Research through Advancing Innovative Neurotechnologies (BRAIN) Initiative. Additional funds now bring the program to a $260 million mark for support in FY 17.

What makes the brain short circuit? Why are MRI machines so noisy? How does Zika affect the brain? Since 2013, the BRAIN Initiative has expanded neuroscience research committed to answer questions such as these. Although medical advancements have improved overall treatment, the underlying causes of many neurological and psychiatric conditions remain unknown, due to the intricacy of the human brain.

“There are very few effective cures for neurological and neuropsychiatric disorders… by pushing the boundaries of fundamental neuroscience research, NIH BRAIN Initiative scientists are providing the insights researchers will need to develop 21st century treatments,” said Walter J. Koroshetz, director of NIH’s National Institute of Neurological Disorders & Stroke.

The program aims to plant new insights into scientists who treat a wide range of brain disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease, schizophrenia, autism, epilepsy, and traumatic brain injury. It attracts a diverse group of scientists from disciplines ranging from neuroscience and engineering to ethics. With the addition of 110 new awards, NIH will now call attention to team-driven projects and new technologies.

The BRAIN Initiative includes 10 NIH Institutes whose missions and current research portfolios enhance its goals. Aside from NIH, other federal partners in the initiative include the National Science Foundation, the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, the US Food and Drug Administration, and the Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity. Click here to view all of the active BRAIN Initiative funding opportunities available through FY 18

Source: GRC GrantWeek

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Google Plans $1 Billion in Grants

Google recently announced three new initiatives, including one that will provide $1 billion in Google.org grants over five years to nonprofits around the world. The $1 billion in grants will go to non-profits that use technology and innovation to tackle complex global challenges in three key areas: Education, Economic Opportunity, and Inclusion (fighting racial bias to advance inclusion and justice for all). In addition, Google is launching Grow with Google, which is designed to give Americans free access to the tools and training they need to get a job.  The third initiative is a program to enable Google users to volunteer 1 million hours to help selected non-profit organizations.

Sources: GRC GrantWeek and Google

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NSF Drops Pre-proposals and Deadlines for Most Programs in the Biology Directorate

On October 5, 2017, NSF issued a Dear Colleague Letter that announced important changes to many of the programs under the Biological Sciences Directorate. The biggest change was that, as of January 2018, there will be no more pre-proposals or full proposal deadlines; rather, full proposals will be accepted at any time to the core programs in the Division of Environmental Biology (DEB), the Division of Integrative Organismal Systems (IOS), the Division of Molecular and Cellular Biosciences (MCB), and to the programs in the Research Resources Cluster of the Division of Biological Infrastructure (DBI).

James Olds, Assistant Director of the Directorate of Biological Sciences, states that “[b]y accepting proposals at any time, investigators will have greater opportunities to prepare their proposals, build strong collaborations, and think more creatively, thereby resulting in more complex, interdisciplinary projects that have the potential to dramatically advance biological science. We anticipate that the elimination of deadlines will reduce the burden on institutions and the community by expanding the submission period over the course of the year, in contrast to the previous fixed yearly deadlines.”

Source: National Science Foundation 

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Recent Submissions


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Recent Awards

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FY 2017-18 First Quarter Awards: A Pictorial Overview

FY18 Q1 Awards by College DivisionFY18 Q1 Awards by SourceFY18 Q1 Major Funding Sources

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UWL & UW System Grants

UW Foundation Carol Dobrunz Endowment Fund

Program contact: UWL Foundation 

Program summary: This fund supports conference costs for non-tenured faculty or instructional academic staff (IAS) without an indefinite appointment. The recipient must meet the following criteria: 1) must be employed at UWL with at least a 75 percent appointment; 2) must be either a non-tenured faculty member or a member of instructional academic staff without an indefinite appointment; 3) must be attending a national conference within her/his discipline; 4) may not have previously received this award.

Deadline: March 30, 2018


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UWL Curricular Redesign Grants

Program contact: UWL Center for Advancing Teaching & Learning (CATL)

Program summary: Curricular Redesign Grants support groups of instructors to develop or redesign and implement curricula and teaching practices in academic programs. The grants fund projects that involve significant revisions intended to address challenging learning goals, student learning problems, and/or achievement gaps. Priority will be given to projects that go above and beyond normal curriculum development, course updates, and minor revisions. Projects should include design, assessment, and further improvement of curriculum and teaching practices.

Deadline: February 16, 2018

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UWL International Program Development Fund

Program contact: Rose Brougham (rbrougham@uwlax.edu)

Program summary: Through institutional partnerships and other scholarly activities, university faculty and academic staff are connected with other universities and organizations throughout the world. International experiences bring the world to the classroom, enhance research, and assist in preparing students, faculty, and staff in becoming global citizens for the 21st Century. The grant program focuses on the development of faculty- and staff-led programs (e.g., scoping visits) or faculty exchanges.

Deadline: February 5, 2018

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UWL International Scholarship Grant

rogram contact: UWL Provost Office

Program summary: The program supports internationalization of the university through research and other scholarly projects that are international in scope and have the potential to transform the applicant’s research. One of the primary outcomes associated with this program is the support of travel costs to present research at international venues. However, UWL employees may submit proposals associated with conducting scholarly endeavors abroad and/or enhancing their professional development in a manner that maximizes the interaction between faculty/staff and the host culture/community. Proposals must be approved by the department and dean and demonstrate that the university will realize tangible benefits.

Deadline: February 5, 2018

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UWL Visiting Scholar/Artist of Color Program

Program contact: UWL Provost Office

Program summary: The Visiting Scholar/Artist of Color Program supports bringing four or more scholars/artists of color to campus each year. The purpose of a larger number of shorter visits (rather than semester-long programs) serves to increase the program’s visibility on campus and increase the potential representation of individuals across the university. Members of UWL faculty and academic staff may nominate individuals to visit campus during the academic year. A primary goal is significant interaction with students as well as faculty and staff by the visiting scholar/artist. Travel costs and honoraria may be requested in the grant.

Deadline: December 4, 2017 (for spring semester scholars)

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UW System/WiSys Applied Research Grant (ARG) & AR-WiTAG

Funding agencies: WiSys & UW System

Program summary: The Applied Research Grant (ARG) program encourages faculty and academic staff to apply their expertise and scholarship to the economic development of Wisconsin and further afield. Applied research activities improve the connection between knowledge and practice while promoting positive change in the state’s economy. Potential benefits of these activities include fostering business expansion and improving profitability, creating jobs and enhancing workforce quality, reducing costs and increasing efficiency, and improving the quality of Wisconsin’s products and services. Proposals are invited from faculty and staff in ALL academic disciplines, including the humanities and social sciences. Funding is available for one year to researchers at all UW institutions. For the humanities and social sciences, in addition to the benefits outline above, potential impact could be directed towards societal impact, quality of life, cultural or environmental impact, impact on health as well as public policy and services.

The Applied Research-WiSys Technology Grant (AR-WiTAG) program encourages faculty and academic staff from science and technology fields to apply their expertise and scholarship to the economic development of Wisconsin and further afield through the development of high-value intellectual property and/or marketable products. Projects that address a clear and unmet need from industry are strongly encouraged.

Deadlines:

  • Intent to submit email due December 18, 2017 (required)
  • Full proposal due to ORSP by January 12, 2018; due to WiSys by January 29, 2018

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Grant News, October 2017

Community Connections

Hear, Here: Visions of Downtown La Crosse

Latest News

Save the Date: UW System/WiSys Applied Research Grants Workshop, Oct. 18

President Signs Memorandum to Increase Access to High-Quality STEM Education 

Grant Research Funding for Suicide Prevention

CDC Introduces New Database for Cancer Researchers

SAMHSA’s Redesigned Learning Center

Recent Submissions & Awards

UWL & UW System Grants

UWL Curricular Redesign Grants 

UWL Faculty Research Grants

UWL International Program Development Fund

UWL International Scholarship Grant

UWL Visiting Scholar/Artist of Color

UW System/WiSys Applied Research Grant & AR-Wi-TAG

Wisconsin Joint Solicitation for Groundwater Research & Monitoring

External Grants

Grants listed below require the institutional GRC log-in to access. If you need the GRC log-in, please see the newsletter in your UWL inbox or contact ORSP.

Local/Regional Grants

American Association of University Women
La Crosse Community Foundation
Wisconsin Humanities Council
Xcel Energy Foundation

Arts / Humanities / International

 American Musicological Society
American-Scandinavian Foundation
Asian Cultural Council
Blakemore Foundation
Calgary Institute for the Humanities
 Institute of Museum and Library Services
 National Endowment for the Arts
National Endowment for the Humanities
New York Public Library
U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum
United States-Japan Foundation
Virginia Foundation for the Humanities
 
Education / Economic and Community Development
American Association of University Women Educational Foundation
Congressional Hispanic Caucus Institutes
Health

Science / Technology / Engineering / Math

American Mathematical Society
American Museum of Natural History
 American Statistical Association
Association of American Geographers
Field Museum of Natural History
Grass Foundation
National Science Foundation
U.S. Department of Agriculture
 U.S. Department of Commerce
U.S. Department of Defense
U.S. Department of Energy
U.S. Department of the Interior
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
U.S.-Israel Binational Science Foundation

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Community Connections

Hear, Here: Visions of Downtown La Crosse

Increasing community engagement is one of the pillars of UWL’s strategic plan, outlined as a “key component to our teaching, scholarly, & service mission.” In ORSP, we get to be at the front lines as faculty and staff come together to develop, plan, and write grants that will help them connect to and serve the broader community. In this month’s newsletter, we would like to applaud Dr. Ariel Beaujot (History) for her dedication to developing collaborations across the campus and in the community. Beaujot and her students have done a variety of projects within the community, including Hear, Here: Visions of Downtown La Crosse and [art]ifact: where history meets art. In this article, we will focus on her Hear, Here project.

Hear, Here is an oral history project that focuses on 1) sharing stories of local, underrepresented community groups, such as the Ho Chunk, black, and homeless communities, and 2) “externaliz[ing] the inner thoughts and stories so that people from the community would know how the community was experienced by others.” By sharing the stories of the past and present, Beaujot hopes that “we might think about where our community has been, where it is now, and where we might want it to go in the future.” There are street-level signs throughout the downtown area (the link above shows where you can find them). The signs provide a toll-free number that will connect a person to a “story that happened in the location where they stand.” Furthermore, if a person stays on the line after the story is completed, he or she can leave their own story and it may be used at that site and online at the Hear, Here website (pending review of the story with the alignment of the project). The project began in 2015 with 28 stories, and will run until 2020; the project currently has a total of 50 community stories, and Beaujot’s research group hopes to reach 60 as the new goal. This project has been funded by internal funding (two Faculty Research Grants) and local organizations, including the La Crosse Community Foundation, Xcel Energy Foundation, and the Wisconsin Humanities Council.

The Hear, Here project has provided Beaujot with an excellent opportunity to collaborate across campus and the community, contributing to the developing and ongoing conversations about the history of La Crosse and the people who live here. The project initially began in collaboration with UWL Continuing Education & Extension, where community members were invited to collaborate with Beaujot’s history class to research stories, learn how to conduct ethical interviews, and create content/visuals for the website, phone system, pamphlets, posters, and grants. She also reached out to Murphy Library’s Special Collections, the Oral History Program, and the English and Art departments to develop content for the website and phone system (the Oral History Program provided the initial 15 stories for the project). Beaujot’s collaboration expanded to include additional community members, such as Downtown Mainstreet, Inc. and the Heritage Preservation Commission, with more collaborations developing at this time.

This project has had a positive impact on the work and research experiences of many of Beaujot’s students. From helping with grant application development to researching, interviewing, and collecting data for the final stories to be shared at each Hear, Here site in the downtown area, each student has contributed significantly to each level of project development, which has given them hands-on experience that will prepare them for jobs after graduation. For Beaujot, this project has been an opportunity for the university and the community to work together, saying that it “helps us see each other as being one and the same—we as professors live in the community,  [and] the community is part of the important work we do here at [UWL].”

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Latest News

Save the Date: UW System/WiSys Applied Research Grants Workshop, Oct. 18

Please join ORSP and UWL’s WiSys Regional Associate Tony Hanson on Wednesday, October 18, from 10:00 am-12:00 pm to discuss the upcoming UW System/WiSys Applied Research Grant program funding cycle. This session will be held in 150 Murphy Library (Institute for Campus Excellence), and it will focus on updates to the guidelines, proposal development best practices, and providing an opportunity to ask questions. If you are unable to attend, there will be a webinar provided (with limited spaces); RSVP here to secure your spot.

You can review upcoming WiSys grant opportunities and guidelines at their website. Intent to submit emails (required) for the Applied Research Grant are due December 18. You must send an email to grants@wisys.org, afgp@uwsa.edu, and grants@uwlax.edu that summarizes the proposal’s goals and the research plan (500 word cap).

UW-La-Crosse-Oct-18-ARG-Info-Session-Email

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President Signs Memorandum to Increase Access to High-Quality STEM Education 

On September 25, President Trump signed a Presidential Memorandum (PM) that directs Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos to initiate new STEM priorities within existing Department of Education (ED) programs. The goal of this memorandum is to increase access to high-quality STEM education, with an emphasis on increasing access to computer science (CS) education. ED will release new information once they have had time to discuss how this new priority will be implemented in upcoming funding opportunities. The full PM can be found on the White House website.

Key points from the PM include:

  • Establishing an ED priority on promoting high-quality STEM education, with a particular focus on CS;
  • Taking into account this new STEM/CS priority when awarding grant funds under various competitive grant programs in fiscal year 2018 and in future years;
  • Identifying grant programs to apply this new STEM/CS priority, with the goal of devoting at least $200 million in grant funds per year;
  • Exploring other administrative actions to promote CS education in order to add or increase focus on these activities in existing K-12 and post-secondary programs. The Secretary is also required to provide guidance documents and other technical assistance that could support high quality CS education.
  • Issuing a report to the Director of the Office of Management & Budget, no later than 90 days after the end of each fiscal year, on the activities carried out in the previous fiscal year, as well as the administrative actions taken, and whether any of the actions under this initiative have succeeded in expanding access to STEM/CS education.

Sources: UW System and the White House, Office of the Press Secretary

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Grant Research Funding for Suicide Prevention

On September 19, Dr. Jill Harkavy-Friedman, Vice President of Research at the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention (AFSP), provided a detailed overview of services, funding priorities and advocacy efforts to a group of GRC member institutions. Dr. Harkavy-Friedman also highlighted the organization’s five core strategies—research, education, public awareness, advocacy, and outreach/support—which intricately anchor all related programs and projects. She stressed the importance of community engagement and ongoing research despite the stigmas associated with suicide. To her point, AFSP is a member of the Project 2025, a campaign driven by partnering agencies, accrediting bodies, professional associations, and industry leaders committed to reduce the rate of suicide by ten percent within a ten-year span.

AFSP is now accepting grant applications to support studies that will increase practitioners and advocates understanding of suicide or test treatments and other interventions that save lives. Multi-year focus and innovation opportunities are now available for early, mid-, and late-career researchers for projects lasting up to five years. Click here to view AFSP’s latest annual report, which features previously awarded projects and additional information about organizational accomplishments, donor trends, and local chapter information.

Source: GRC GrantWeek

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CDC Introduces New Database for Cancer Researchers

The Center of Disease Control & Prevention (CDC) is increasing access to cancer-related statistics and de-identified cancer incidence data through the National Program for Cancer Registries and the National Cancer Institute’s Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program. Both databases will now feed into the United States Cancer Statistics (USCS) database, which serves as the official source of federal cancer-related data. At no charge, researchers can tap into the USCS to view interactive graphs and information organized by demographic and/or tumor characteristics from all 50 states, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico. The USCS currently holds 22 million cases.

Source: GRC GrantWeek

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SAMHSA’s Redesigned Learning Center

The Substance Abuse & Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) partnered with the Centers for Disease Control & Prevention, Agency for Health Research &Quality, and the National Institutes of Health to redesign its Learning Center within the National Registry of Evidence-based Programs &Practices (NREPP). The NREPP is “an evidence-based repository and review system designed to improve access to information on evaluated interventions and reduce the lag time between creation of scientific knowledge and its practical application in the field.” The Learning Center offers resources that support evidence-based practice or program development, program implementation, program sustainability, behavior health topics, and emerging evidence in culture-based practices. See the Learning Center website for details.

Source: GRC GrantWeek


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Recent Submissions

 


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Recent Awards

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UWL & UW System Grants

UWL Curricular Redesign Grants

Program contact: Center for Advancing Teaching & Learning (CATL)

Program summary: Curricular Redesign Grants (CRG) support groups of instructors to develop or redesign and implement curricula and teaching practices in academic programs. The grants fund projects that involve significant revisions intended to address challenging learning goals, student learning problems, and/or achievement gaps. Priority will be given to projects that go above and beyond normal curriculum development, course updates, and minor revisions. Projects should include design, assessment, and further improvement of curriculum and teaching practices.

Deadline: February 16, 2018

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UWL Faculty Research Grants

Program contact: Office of Research &Sponsored Programs (ORSP)

Program summary: The purpose of the Faculty Research Program is to promote and support scholarly research activities campus-wide. UWL provides funds on a competitive, peer-reviewed basis to eligible faculty, which includes all full-time faculty and instructional academic staff with a continuing appointment. The term “research” is meant to denote investigative activities–i.e., scholarly efforts to advance knowledge, increase skills, and improve understanding in any academic discipline. Projects must demonstrate originality and must yield results which are potentially publishable in a reputable journal, in book form, or through other recognized forms of presentation and dissemination.

Deadline: October 25, 2017 at 4:00 p.m.

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UWL International Program Development Fund

Program contact: Lema Kabashi (lkabashi@uwlax.edu)

Program summary: The grant program focuses on the development of faculty- and staff-led programs (e.g., scoping visits) or faculty exchanges.

Deadline: October 2, 2017

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UWL International Scholarship Grant

Program contact: Provost Office

Program summary: The program supports internationalization of the university through research and other scholarly projects that are international in scope and have the potential to transform the applicant’s research. One of the primary outcomes associated with this program is the support of travel costs to present research at international venues. However, UWL employees may submit proposals associated with conducting scholarly endeavors abroad and/or enhancing their professional development in a manner that maximizes the interaction between faculty/staff and the host culture/community. Proposals must be approved by the department and dean and demonstrate that the university will realize tangible benefits.

Deadline: October 2, 2017

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UWL Visiting Scholar / Artist of Color Program

Program contact: UWL Provost Office

Program summary: The Visiting Scholar/Artist of Color Program supports bringing four or more scholars/artists of color to campus each year. The purpose of a larger number of shorter visits (rather than semester-long programs) serves to increase the program’s visibility on campus and increase the potential representation of individuals across the university. Members of UWL faculty and academic staff may nominate individuals to visit campus during the academic year. A primary goal is significant interaction with students as well as faculty and staff by the visiting scholar/artist. Travel costs and honoraria may be requested in the grant.

Deadline: December 4, 2017 (spring semester scholars)

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UW System/WiSys Applied Research Grant & AR-WiTAG

Program contact: Office of Research & Sponsored Programs (ORSP)

Program summary: The Applied Research Grant (ARG) program encourages faculty and academic staff to apply their expertise and scholarship to the economic development of Wisconsin and further afield. Applied research activities improve the connection between knowledge and practice while promoting positive change in the state’s economy. Potential benefits of these activities include fostering business expansion and improving profitability, creating jobs and enhancing workforce quality, reducing costs and increasing efficiency, and improving the quality of Wisconsin’s products and services. Proposals are invited from faculty and staff in ALL academic disciplines, including the humanities and social sciences. Funding is available for one year to researchers at all UW institutions. For the humanities and social sciences, in addition to the benefits outline above, potential impact could be directed towards societal impact, quality of life, cultural or environmental impact, impact on health as well as public policy and services.

The Applied Research-WiSys Technology Grant (AR-WiTAG) program encourages faculty and academic staff from science and technology fields to apply their expertise and scholarship to the economic development of Wisconsin and further afield through the development of high-value intellectual property and/or marketable products. Projects that address a clear and unmet need from industry are strongly encouraged.

Deadlines:

  • Intent to submit email due December 18, 2017 (required)
  • Full proposal due to ORSP by January 12, 2018; due to WiSys by January 29, 2018


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Wisconsin Joint Solicitation for Groundwater Research & Monitoring

Program contact: Office of Research &Sponsored Programs (ORSP)

Program summary: The WRI Joint Solicitation is a coordinated effort of the UW System, and the Wisconsin Departments of Natural Resources; Agriculture, Trade & Consumer Protection; and Safety & Professional Services. This cooperative solicitation allows interested individuals to prepare project proposals that can be submitted to several different funding sources simultaneously and eliminates the need to submit similar proposals several times for different solicitation efforts. The joint solicitation is intended to make it easier for interested researchers to prepare proposals, promote coordination among state organizations and researchers, and enhance the ability of state agencies and the UW System to meet their objectives. Funding is available for new research or monitoring to meet specific state program needs and objectives. Approximately $200,000 to $500,000 will be available for new groundwater projects in FY 2019.

Deadline: November 1, 2017

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Grant News, September 2017

Latest News

Changes to UWL Faculty Research Grant Guidelines & New How-to Video

UWL Faculty Research Grant Workshops, September 13 & 14

New Non-Federal Proposal Development Checklist

New NIH Clinical Trial Funding Policy

Upcoming Proposed Changes to NSF Guidelines

Funding Cuts for DOE Office of Science Growing Unlikely in Congress

Recent Submissions & Awards

Community Connections

Community Connections: Dr. Niti Mishra and Dr. Scott Cooper

UWL & UW System Grants

UWL Faculty Research Grants

UWL Faculty Development Grant

UWL International Program Development Fund

UWL International Scholarship Grant

Wisconsin Joint Solicitation for Groundwater Research & Monitoring

External Grants

Grants listed below require the institutional GRC log-in to access. If you need the GRC log-in, please see the newsletter in your UWL inbox or contact ORSP.

Arts / Humanities / International

American Council of Learned Societies
American Philosophical Society
Archaeological Institute of America
Council for International Exchange of Scholars
Fulbright International Education Administrators Program-Nov 01, 2017 (**contact Miranda Panzer in IEE for more information)
Folger Shakespeare Library
Graham Foundation
Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center
Institute for Advanced Study School of Social Science
National Endowment for the Arts
National Endowment for the Humanities
American Association of University Women Educational Foundation
American Council on Education
Dow Jones Newspaper Fund (undergraduates/graduates)
Ethics and Excellence in Journalism Foundation
Spencer Foundation
State Justice Institute
Health
American Foundation for Suicide Prevention
National Institutes of Health
U.S. Department of Defense
Science / Technology / Engineering / Math
American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS)
Joint Institute for Laboratory Astrophysics
National Science Foundation
Partnership for Clean Competition
U.S. Department of Defense
Wenner-Gren Foundation for Anthropological Research

Latest News

Changes to UWL Faculty Research Grant Guidelines & New How-to Video

The UWL Faculty Research Grant program guidelines have been updated for the upcoming October 25 submission deadline:

  1. Proposal narratives are now capped at 5 pages total not including references. References are not allowed to include additional content that should otherwise be addressed in the narrative (e.g., linking to further content). This slightly shortens the total allowable page length, which was formerly 5-10 pages including references. The same font and spacing requirements still apply (size 11 font and line spacing of no less than 1.5).
  2. In the required proposal narrative section addressing past Faculty Research Grant and/or International Development Fund awards (if applicable), applicants must list ALL past Faculty Research Grant awards received by any principal or co-principal investigator. For applicants with multiple past Faculty Research Grant awards, emphasis should be given to the outcomes and products of the two most recent awards.

See the ORSP Funding Sources webpage for the full updated guidelines.

The Digital Measures interface used to create internal grant proposals has been recently updated. A new video providing step-by-step guidance for creating an internal grant proposal in Digital Measures is available on the Faculty Research Grant webpage.

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UWL Faculty Research Grant Workshops, September 13 & 14

ORSP will be hosting two workshops highlighting proposal development best practices for the UWL Faculty Research Grant program. The workshop will also provide an overview of the process for preparing application materials in Digital Measures. No prior RSVPs are required for the sessions, which will be held in 150 Murphy Library (Institute for Campus Excellence) on the following dates:

  • Wednesday, September 13, 9:30-10:30 am
  • Thursday, September 14, 1:30-2:30 pm

More information about the grant program can be found on the ORSP website.

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New Non-Federal Proposal Development Checklist

ORSP has developed a new proposal development checklist for non-federal funding agencies to help faculty & staff plan their proposal development efforts. The checklist provides an overview of grant application components commonly required by non-federal sponsors. The non-federal checklist is an addition to several pre-existing checklists for several federal agencies, which are also available on the ORSP website.

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New NIH Clinical Trial Funding Policy

Effective January 25, 2018, a new NIH Clinical Trial Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) policy will go into effect. The new policy requires all NIH applications involving clinical trials be submitted through an FOA specific to clinical trials. Applications that involve clinical that are not submitted in response to a clinical trial-specific FOA will be returned without review.

If the answer to all four questions below is yes, research meets NIH’s definition of a clinical trial and would be subject to the new policy:

  1. Does the study involve human participants?
  2. Are the participants prospectively assigned to an intervention?
  3. Is the study designed to evaluate the effect of the intervention on the participants?
  4. Is the effect that will be evaluated a health-related biomedical or behavioral outcome?

Additional information about the new policy can be found on the NIH Open Mike blog by Dr. Mike Lauer, NIH Deputy Director for Extramural Research.

Source: Council on Governmental Relations

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Upcoming Proposed Changes to NSF Guidelines

The National Science Foundation (NSF) is currently updating its Proposal & Award Policies & Procedures Guide (PAPPG) for 2018. The PAPPG draft has been shared with the community to gather feedback. NSF is reviewing comments and preparing to have the final PAPPG out by fall 2017. Here are a list of some proposed changes that you will want to keep in mind as you develop your grant applications:

  1. New Header Requirement in the Project Description: The Project Description will require a specific, separate section labeled “Intellectual Merit.” While the Project Summary has required the separation of the Broader Impact and Intellectual Merit sections, this will be the first time it is a requirement for the 15-page Project Description.
  2. Results from Prior NSF Support Clarification: NSF has provided additional language to this section to clarify who should include a “Prior NSF Support” section in their proposals. The proposed revisions will state that “if any PI or co-PI identified on the proposal has received NSF support through an award with an end date in the past five years or in the future (including any current funding and no cost extensions), information on the award is required for each PI and co-PI, regardless of whether the support was directly related to the proposal or not.”
  3. Collaborators and Other Affiliations (COA) Template Implementation: ORSP rolled out the pilot Excel template after NSF mandated its use for all applications on April 24, 2017. The revised guidelines will provide “specific detail on the types of collaborations that must be identified in the template.” At the source link below, NSF has provided answers to common questions asked by the community in its recent Proposal & Award Policy Newsletter (see page 4).
  4. Eligibility Standards: NSF is adding a new subcategory for Institutes of Higher Education (IHE) that are collaborating with international branch campuses of IHEs. NSF writes, “Specifically, if a proposal includes funding to be provided to an international branch campus of a U.S. institution (including through use of subawards and consultant arrangements), the proposer must explain the benefit(s) of performing (part or all) of the project at the international campus. Further, the proposer must justify why the project activities cannot be performed at the US campus.” Furthermore, foreign organization eligibility will be revised to include that two criteria must be met by the proposer: 1) “The foreign organization contributes a unique organization, facilities, geographic location and/or access to unique data resources not generally available to US investigators (or which would require significant effort or time to duplicate), or other resources that are essential to the success of the proposed project”; and 2) “The organization to be supported offers significant scientific and engineering education, training or research opportunities to the US.”

Source: NSF Proposal and Award Policy Newsletter

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Funding Cuts for DOE Office of Science Growing Unlikely in Congress

Funding for fundamental energy and physics research at the Department of Energy (DOE) are expected to avoid major cuts as both chambers of Congress are moving forward on a new appropriations bill that rejects the Trump administration’s request to sharply reduce funding for the Office of Science (SC). While both bills will need to continue through the budgetary process before final numbers are reached, neither the Senate nor the House accepted the proposed 17 percent cut to SC funding. In fact, the House provided level funding for the office, while the Senate includes a topline increase of three percent.

While the Trump Administration requested reductions in five of the six program offices within SC, these cuts were soundly rejected by legislators of both houses. No program area saw reduced funding in both the House and Senate bill, and while the House reduced funding for Biological and Environmental Research at DOE by five percent, the Senate increased funding for that category by three percent (the administration had requested a 43 percent cut, nowhere near legislators’ final decision). Both chambers and the administration prioritized funding for Advanced Scientific Computing Research with the House raising funding levels by seven percent, and the Senate increasing it by 18 percentage points (the administration had requested a 12 percent increase).

Source: GRC GrantWeek 

Recent Submissions


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Recent Awards

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Community Connections: Dr. Niti Mishra and Dr. Scott Cooper


Increasing community engagement is one of the pillars of UWL’s strategic plan, outlined as a “key component to our teaching, scholarly, & service mission.” In ORSP, we get to be at the front lines as faculty and staff come together to develop, plan, and write grants that will help them connect to and serve the broader community. With all the great community projects that come through our office, and via word-of-mouth, we wanted to take a moment and bring attention to all the great collaborations that have a significant impact on the campus and surrounding community.

In this month’s newsletter, we would like to commend Dr. Niti Mishra (Geography and Earth Science) and Dr. Scott Cooper (Biology) for their recent collaboration with the Brice Prairie Conservation Association (BPCA). One of the goals of the BPCA is to “promote the general health and welfare of the community by supporting sound management practices for the Black River, Lake Onalaska, and the Mississippi River.” To meet this goal, Mishra, along with his student Zach Woodcock, used a drone to conduct aerial surveys of purple loosestrife (Lythrum salicaria), an invasive plant species to the regional wetlands and the La Crosse area; the test study area was the La Crosse River Delta near Bangor, WI. Mishra’s research specializes in “utilizing remotely sensed data (images acquired from satellites, aircrafts and now drones) for various terrestrial ecological applications including vegetation monitoring.” Cooper states that, since loosestrife can be located in areas that are difficult to reach by foot, the use of the drone has been greatly beneficial to locating and mapping this species. Mishra further emphasizes the positive use of this new technology in managing and detecting loosestrife, “[a]nalysis of drone acquired imagery in combination with carefully collected filed sample locations can be utilized to semi-automatically detect and map the invasive species with higher accuracy and in a spatially explicit manner.”

The broader impacts of this collaboration are three-fold. The results of the drone aerial shots have been shared with the BPCA who, according to Cooper, “were very impressed with the quality and utility of the results.” Mishra and Cooper plan to conduct additional flights over Lake Neshonoc and near Brice Prairie. The BPCA collaborates with other outside agencies, such as the Army Corps of Engineers, Fish and Wildlife Service, and the Department of Natural Resources on similar projects. Cooper states, “This collaboration is providing valuable projects for our students and faculty with direct impacts on the community.”  Mishra’s student received a scholarship to conduct research on this real life ecological problem, which will help the student, and others like him, to “gain valuable research and practical experience[s].” Furthermore, the effects of this collaboration help to increase ecological and environmental awareness on the UWL campus and in the La Crosse community.

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UWL & UW System Grants

UWL Faculty Research Grants

Program contact: Office of Research &Sponsored Programs (ORSP)

Program summary: The purpose of the Faculty Research Program is to promote and support scholarly research activities campus-wide. UWL provides funds on a competitive, peer-reviewed basis to eligible faculty, which includes all full-time faculty and instructional academic staff with a continuing appointment. The term “research” is meant to denote investigative activities–i.e., scholarly efforts to advance knowledge, increase skills, and improve understanding in any academic discipline. Projects must demonstrate originality and must yield results which are potentially publishable in a reputable journal, in book form, or through other recognized forms of presentation and dissemination.

Deadline: October 25, 2017 at 4:00 p.m.

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UWL Faculty Development Grants

Program contact: Center for Advancing Teaching & Learning (CATL)

Program summary: Faculty Development Grants support the professional development of faculty and instructional academic staff, and projects intended to improve teaching and learning. There are three types of grants:

1. Teaching Innovation Grant: These grants support instructors who want to expand their pedagogical knowledge and expertise. Funds support small-scale projects in which instructors try innovative teaching practices and approaches in their classroom. The innovation can be something completely new, invented by the applicant, or a practice new to the applicant even if the practice itself is not a “new” one in the field of teaching.

2. Scholarship of Teaching & Learning Grant (SoTL): SoTL grants support projects intended to advance teaching through scholarly inquiry into student scholarship, teaching, and learning. Projects should 1) focus explicitly on observed student learning “problems” that reflect a gap between what instructors expect students to learn and their actual performance; 2) propose a study to investigate the causes and possible solutions to the problem; 3) present systematic evidence that explains the problem and how to improve student learning; and 4) culminate in a scholarly product that can be peer reviewed.

3. Professional Development Grant: These grants support instructors to develop expertise or projects that enhance the quality of undergraduate and/or graduate academics at UWL. The grants may support activities during the academic year and summer. Projects may involve multiple applicants. Professional development projects typically are one of two types: 1) short-duration projects (e.g., attendance at a workshop on teaching in one’s discipline); or 2) longer, ongoing projects (e.g., participation in a faculty seminar for a semester) that expand the training of the applicant in their area of expertise, and can be translated to the classroom or other areas of undergraduate and/or graduate academics.

Deadline: September 22, 2017 at noon

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UWL International Program Development Fund

Program contact: Lema Kabashi (lkabashi@uwlax.edu)

Program summary: The grant program focuses on the development of faculty- and staff-led programs (e.g., scoping visits) or faculty exchanges.

Deadline: October 2, 2017

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UWL International Scholarship Grants

Program contact: Provost Office

Program summary: The program supports internationalization of the university through research and other scholarly projects that are international in scope and have the potential to transform the applicant’s research. One of the primary outcomes associated with this program is the support of travel costs to present research at international venues. However, UWL employees may submit proposals associated with conducting scholarly endeavors abroad and/or enhancing their professional development in a manner that maximizes the interaction between faculty/staff and the host culture/community. Proposals must be approved by the department and dean and demonstrate that the university will realize tangible benefits.

Deadline: October 2, 2017

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Wisconsin Joint Solicitation for Groundwater Research & Monitoring

Program contact: Office of Research &Sponsored Programs (ORSP)

Program summary: The WRI Joint Solicitation is a coordinated effort of the UW System, and the Wisconsin Departments of Natural Resources; Agriculture, Trade & Consumer Protection; and Safety & Professional Services. This cooperative solicitation allows interested individuals to prepare project proposals that can be submitted to several different funding sources simultaneously and eliminates the need to submit similar proposals several times for different solicitation efforts. The joint solicitation is intended to make it easier for interested researchers to prepare proposals, promote coordination among state organizations and researchers, and enhance the ability of state agencies and the UW System to meet their objectives. Funding is available for new research or monitoring to meet specific state program needs and objectives. Approximately $200,000 to $500,000 will be available for new groundwater projects in FY 2019.

Deadline: November 1, 2017

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Grant News, August 2017

Community Connections

Grow Our Own Teacher Diversity Program (GOO-TD)

Latest News

Farewell to the Grants.gov Legacy PDF Application

House Draft Spending Bill Rejects Elimination of NEA and NEH

House Rejects Some Administration Cuts to Science Agencies, but Retains Others

IMLS Opens Competitions for Key Library Programs

Funding Cuts for DOE Office of Science Growing Unlikely in Congress

Recent Submissions & Awards

UWL & UW System Grants

Faculty Research Grants

UWL Faculty Development Grant

UWL International Program Development Fund

UWL International Scholarship Grant

External Grants

Grants listed below require the institutional GRC log-in to access. If you need the GRC log-in, please see the newsletter in your UWL inbox or contact ORSP.

Arts / Humanities / International

National Archives and Records Administration
National Endowment for the Arts
National Endowment for the Humanities
National Gallery of Art
National Humanities Center
National Trust for Historic Preservation
Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study
Samuel H. Kress Foundation
The Library of Congress
Education / Economic and Community Development
American Institute for Economic Research
Foundation for Food and Agriculture Research
Kazanjian Economics Foundation
National Education Association Foundation
Spencer Foundation

Health

Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality
American Cancer Society
American Society of Clinical Oncology
National Institutes of Health
Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute

Science / Technology / Engineering / Math

American Chemical Society
Association for Women in Mathematics
Fund for Astrophysical Research
Mathematical Sciences Research Institute
National Aeronautics and Space Administration
National Science Foundation
North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO)
Sigma Xi, The Scientific Research Society
Smithsonian Institution
 U.S. Department of Defense
U.S. Department of Energy
Whitehall Foundation

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Community Connections


Increasing community engagement is one of the pillars of UWL’s strategic plan, outlined as a “key component to our teaching, scholarly, & service mission.” In ORSP, we get to be at the front lines as faculty and staff come together to develop, plan, and write grants that will help them connect to and serve the broader community. With all the great community projects that come through our office, we wanted to take a moment and give a shout-out to the collaborations that have a significant impact on the campus and surrounding community.

In our first shout-out, we would like to commend the School of Education, Professional & Continuing Education (EPC) for their Grow Our Own Teacher Diversity (GOO-TD) program. The purpose of GOO-TD is to “partner with local school districts to increase the number of qualified and culturally diverse educators in our communit[y] PK-12 classrooms.” Currently, EPC is partnering with the La Crosse School District to recruit employees, such as non-certified teacher assistants, into the GOO-TD program to earn their bachelor degrees in education, tuition free. The program not only has an impact on the EPC students enrolled, but also on the students in the PK-12 classroom who will learn from teachers of color who bring their diverse backgrounds and experiences into the teaching field.

This program has been supported in part with funding from the La Crosse Public Education Foundation and the La Crosse Community Foundation.

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Latest News

Farewell to the Grants.gov Legacy PDF Application

Effective December 31, 2017, the legacy PDF application package currently used to submit federal grants will be retired by Grants.gov. The PDF forms are being replaced by Grants.gov Workspace, an electronic application development and submission system that should streamline the application process. More information can be found on the Grants.gov blog.

Workspace has been available for about a year and, for the technological pioneers out there, is currently available for UWL federal grant applicants. However, UWL will not be using Workspace for all federal applications due to the advantages other federal agencies’ electronic systems provide. For example, NSF applications will continue to be submitted via FastLane, and NIH applications will be submitted via ASSIST.

Contact UWL ORSP if you are interested in exploring Workspace or other federal electronic systems, and our staff can assist with account set-up. ORSP has also created an overview of the electronic systems used by UWL for different federal agencies.

Source: Grants.gov Blog

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House Draft Spending Bill Rejects Elimination of NEA and NEH

The US House of Representatives Appropriations Committee approved an FY18 draft spending bill that would fund the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) and the National Endowment of the Arts (NEA) at $145 million each. This amount is $5 million less than approved FY17 levels, but a far cry from the Trump Administration’s plan to eliminate the agencies, as previously announced in its FY 18 budget request. The arts and humanities funding was included as part of a draft bill to provide FY18 funding for the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and agencies within the US Department of the Interior. The bill would also fund the EPA at $7.5 billion, $528 million below the FY17 enacted level, but $1.9 billion above President Trump’s request. The approval opens the door for consideration by the full House later in the summer.  For more information, see the House Appropriations Committee press release and this recent article from the New York Times.

Source: GRC GrantWeek

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House Rejects Some Administration Cuts to Science Agencies, but Retains Others

The House Commerce, Justice, and Science (CJS) Appropriations Subcommittee unveiled the draft of its FY18 spending bill late last month, showing that appropriators’ goals are very different than the presidential budget request submitted earlier this year. The CJS bill allocates funds for NASA, the National Science Foundation (NSF), the National Institute of Standards & Technology (NIST), and the National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), among other agencies. Altogether, the bill recommends a $2.6 billion decrease from FY17 between all CJS agencies. However, this is a $4.8 billion increase from the levels recommended by the Trump Administration.

The topline numbers at NASA would be increased slightly from FY17, with the agency at large receiving a one percent boost, and the Science Mission Directorate, home of the largest extramural research programs in NASA, seeing a two percent rise in funding. Both would have seen slight decreases in the requested budget. The bill does not break down funding levels between mission focuses, such as planetary science and earth science, which has been a contentious issue this year. It also funds the NASA Office of Education, which was zeroed out in the administration’s budget request, as previously reported in GrantWeek.

NSF funding remains level in the CJS bill, rejecting Trump’s proposed $672 million cut. Funding for NSF’s Education & Human Resources Directorate remains level at $880 million, instead of the 14 percent cut suggested by the administration.

NIST would lose a tenth of its funding under this bill, cutting heavily into manufacturing programs such as the Manufacturing Extension Partnership and Manufacturing USA (formerly the National Network for Manufacturing Innovation). While these cuts are millions of dollars below FY17 levels, the administration asked to cut these programs entirely.

NOAA would see sharp cuts in funding, losing $710 million from FY17. This is in line with the administration’s budget. Much of the loss comes from a reduction in Climate Research, which would be reduced by 19 percent.

Source: GRC GrantWeek

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IMLS Opens Competitions for Key Library Programs

The Institute of Museum & Library Services (IMLS) is accepting applications for the Laura Bush 21st Century Librarian Program and National Leadership Grants for Libraries.

The Laura Bush 21st Century Librarian Program supports professional development, graduate education, and continuing education to help libraries and archives develop a diverse workforce of librarians through Planning Grants (up to $50,000), National Forum Grants (up to $100,000), Research Grants (up to $500,000), and Project Grants (up to $1 million). National Leadership Grants for Libraries fund creative library research or projects that address challenges in the field and can be adapted, scaled, or replicated. It offers Sparks Grants (up to $25,000); Planning Grants (up to $50,000); National Forum Grants (up to $100,000); and Project and Research Grants (up to $2 million). Both programs require proposals to align with one of three theme categories: Community Anchors, National Digital Platform, and Curating Collections.

Preliminary proposals are required for both programs and are due September 1, 2017. Selected applicants will be invited to submit full proposals. A second competition for both programs is expected to be announced in December 2017, with a deadline for preliminary proposals in February 2018.

Source: GRC GrantWeek


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Funding Cuts for DOE Office of Science Growing Unlikely in Congress

Funding for fundamental energy and physics research at the Department of Energy (DOE) are expected to avoid major cuts as both chambers of Congress are moving forward on a new appropriations bill that rejects the Trump Administration’s request to sharply reduce funding for the Office of Science (SC). While both bills will need to continue through the budgetary process before final numbers are reached, neither the Senate nor the House accepted the proposed 17 percent cut to SC funding. In fact, the House provided level funding for the office, while the Senate includes a topline increase of three percent.

While the Trump Administration requested reductions in five of the six program offices within SC, these cuts were soundly rejected by legislators of both houses. No program area saw reduced funding in both the House and Senate bill, and while the House reduced funding for Biological and Environmental Research at DOE by five percent, the Senate increased funding for that category by three percent (the administration had requested a 43 percent cut, nowhere near legislators’ final decision). Both chambers and the administration prioritized funding for Advanced Scientific Computing Research, with the House raising funding levels by seven percent, and the Senate increasing it by 18 percentage points (the administration had requested a 12 percent increase).

Source: GRC Grantweek

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Recent Submissions


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Recent Awards

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UWL & UW System Grants

UWL Faculty Research Grants

Program contact: Office of Research &Sponsored Programs (ORSP)

Program summary: The purpose of the Faculty Research Program is to promote and support scholarly research activities campus-wide. UWL provides funds on a competitive, peer-reviewed basis to eligible faculty, which includes all full-time faculty and instructional academic staff with a continuing appointment. The term “research” is meant to denote investigative activities–i.e., scholarly efforts to advance knowledge, increase skills, and improve understanding in any academic discipline. Projects must demonstrate originality and must yield results which are potentially publishable in a reputable journal, in book form, or through other recognized forms of presentation and dissemination.

Deadline: October 25, 2017 at 4:00 p.m.

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UWL Faculty Development Grant

Program contact: Center for Advancing Teaching & Learning (CATL)

Program summary: Faculty Development Grants support the professional development of faculty and instructional academic staff, and projects intended to improve teaching and learning. There are three types of grants:

1. Teaching Innovation Grant: These grants support instructors who want to expand their pedagogical knowledge and expertise. Funds support small-scale projects in which instructors try innovative teaching practices and approaches in their classroom. The innovation can be something completely new, invented by the applicant, or a practice new to the applicant even if the practice itself is not a “new” one in the field of teaching.

2. Scholarship of Teaching & Learning Grant (SoTL): SoTL grants support projects intended to advance teaching through scholarly inquiry into student scholarship, teaching, and learning. Projects should 1) focus explicitly on observed student learning “problems” that reflect a gap between what instructors expect students to learn and their actual performance; 2) propose a study to investigate the causes and possible solutions to the problem; 3) present systematic evidence that explains the problem and how to improve student learning; and 4) culminate in a scholarly product that can be peer reviewed.

3. Professional Development Grant: These grants support instructors to develop expertise or projects that enhance the quality of undergraduate and/or graduate academics at UWL. The grants may support activities during the academic year and summer. Projects may involve multiple applicants. Professional development projects typically are one of two types: 1) short-duration projects (e.g., attendance at a workshop on teaching in one’s discipline); or 2) longer, ongoing projects (e.g., participation in a faculty seminar for a semester) that expand the training of the applicant in their area of expertise, and can be translated to the classroom or other areas of undergraduate and/or graduate academics.

Deadline: September 22, 2017 at noon

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UWL International Program Development Fund

Program contact: Lema Kabashi (lkabashi@uwlax.edu)

Program summary: The grant program focuses on the development of faculty- and staff-led programs (e.g., scoping visits) or faculty exchanges.

Deadline: October 2, 2017

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UWL International Scholarship Grant

Program contact: Provost Office

Program summary: The program supports internationalization of the university through research and other scholarly projects that are international in scope and have the potential to transform the applicant’s research. One of the primary outcomes associated with this program is the support of travel costs to present research at international venues. However, UWL employees may submit proposals associated with conducting scholarly endeavors abroad and/or enhancing their professional development in a manner that maximizes the interaction between faculty/staff and the host culture/community. Proposals must be approved by the department and dean and demonstrate that the university will realize tangible benefits.

Deadline: October 2, 2017

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Grant News, July 2017

Latest News

NEH Humanities Summer Stipends Grant 

NIH Abandons Plan to Limit Per-Person Grant Awards

NEH Webinar and Workshops Supporting Humanities Public Engagement

Recent Submissions & Awards

Grants 101

The Benefits of Volunteering on a Review Panel

Participant Support Costs: What’s Allowable?

UWL Grants

UWL Faculty Development Grants

UWL International Program Development Fund

UWL International Scholarship Grant

UWL Visiting Scholar/ Artist of Color Program

External Grants

Grants listed below require the institutional GRC log-in to access. If you need the GRC log-in, please see the newsletter in your UWL inbox or contact ORSP.

Arts / Humanities / International

American Council of Learned Societies
American Musicological Society
Council for International Exchange of Scholars
German Marshall Fund of the United States
National Endowment for the Arts
National Endowment for the Humanities
National Gallery of Art
Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study
Russell Sage Foundation
Tinker Foundation

Education / Economic and Community Development

American Educational Research Association
American Institute for Economic Research
Calvin K. Kazanjian Economics Foundation, Inc.
Grant (William T.) Foundation
 Koch (Charles G.) Charitable Foundation
Online Computer Library Center, Inc.
Sociological Initiatives Foundation
Spencer Foundation
State Justice Institute
U.S. Department of Education
Health
American Gastroenterological Association (AGA) Research Foundation
American Society of Clinical Oncology
A.S.P.E.N. Rhoads Research Foundation
Elsa U. Pardee Foundation
Foundation for Physical Therapy
Harry Frank Guggenheim Foundation
 National Institutes of Health
Pharmaceutical Research Manufacturers of America Foundation
Retirement Research Foundation

Science / Technology / Engineering / Math

National Fish and Wildlife Foundation
National Research Council
National Science Foundation
Sloan (Alfred P.) Foundation
U.S. Department of Defense

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Latest News

NEH Humanities Summer Stipends Program

The NEH Summer Stipends program supports individuals pursuing advanced research that is of value to humanities scholars, general audiences, or both. Recipients usually produce articles, monographs, books, digital materials, archaeological site reports, translations, editions, or other scholarly resources. Stipends support full-time work on a humanities project for a period of two months. Projects are supported at any stage of development.

Applicants must be nominated by their institution, and there is a limit of two applicants per institution. Interested individuals should complete a UWL notice of interest (NOI) form and submit it according to the deadline listed below. Before submitting the NOI form, applicants should discuss their project with their department chair and college dean. Submit the completed NOI form to grants@uwlax.edu by the deadline below; include your department chair and college dean in the CC line. Research & Sponsored Programs will facilitate review of NOIs, with anticipated notification of nomination by August 18, 2017. Please contact our office (grants@uwlax.edu) with questions.

Deadlines: UWL notice of interest form (required) due to grants@uwlax.edu – August 4, 2017
NEH proposal submission deadline – September 27, 2017 (annually reoccurring)

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NIH Abandons Plan to Limit Per-Person Grant Awards

Recently, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) proposed a metric, the Grant Support Index (GSI), that would limit total grant support per researcher (to approximately three major NIH awards at any one time). The GSI would have assigned a value to the researcher’s grants based on type, complexity, and size. One reason for proposing the GSI was to create a level playing field for young researchers who are in competition with experienced, senior researchers for the same pots of money. A second reason that NIH wanted to implement the GSI was due to recently collected data showing a generally lower scientific output among researchers/research groups with multiple concurrent grants (“Implementing Limits on Grant Support to Strengthen the Biomedical Research Workforce”).

However, there was a fair amount of protest, mainly from senior researchers and members of NIH’s advisory board, over the proposed GSI. NIH’s director, Francis S. Collins, initially stated that he was in favor of the GSI based on the data provided, but now he has now shifted his perspective, stating that “outside analyses raised doubts about that conclusion. In addition, he said, NIH officials heard questions about how exactly to measure a three-grant equivalency in situations such as team projects. And, he said, critics questioned whether such a ‘formula-driven approach’ fit with the NIH’s longstanding commitment to merit-based grant awards.” Instead, NIH plans to go forward with another solution, the Next Generation Researchers Initiative, where young scientists will have more opportunities to receive funding without penalizing senior researchers.

Source: Chronicle of Higher Education 


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NEH Webinar and Workshops Supporting Humanities Public Engagement

NEH is funding a series of workshops to help humanities scholars write for a broader audience. The workshops, recently highlighted in Inside Higher Ed, will be hosted by Object Lessons, an essay and book series published by The Atlantic and Bloomsbury. The workshops will be held in four locations selected to complement humanities conferences: in early November 2017 around the Society for Literature, Science, and the Arts conference in Tempe, AZ; in late November 2017 around the American Anthropological Association conference in Washington, DC; in January 2018 around the Modern Language Association convention in New York City; and in March 2018 around the Association for Writers and Writing Programs in Tampa, FL. To read the guidelines and apply, visit the Object Lessons website. Participants will receive a stipend to offset the costs of travel, lodging, meals, and incidentals during the institute. Participants who have already planned to travel to the concurrent conference can use the stipend in tandem with, or in place of, other institutional funding.

The workshops tie thematically with NEH’s Public Scholars grant program, which supports well-researched books in the humanities designed to reach a broad audience. The deadline for the next Public Scholars program is February 7, 2018.

Sources: GRC Grantweek and Object Lessons

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Recent Submissions


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Recent Awards

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UWL Grants

UWL Faculty Development Grant

Program contact: UWL Center for Advancing Teaching & Learning (CATL)

Program summary: Faculty Development Grants support the professional development of faculty and instructional academic staff and projects intended to improve teaching and learning. There are three types of grants:

1. Teaching Innovation Grant: These grants support instructors who want to expand their pedagogical knowledge and expertise. Funds support small-scale projects in which instructors try innovative teaching practices and approaches in their classroom. The innovation can be something completely new, invented by the applicant, or a practice new to the applicant even if the practice itself is not a “new” one in the field of teaching.

2. Scholarship of Teaching & Learning Grant (SoTL): SoTL grants support projects intended to advance teaching through scholarly inquiry into student scholarship, teaching, and learning. Projects should 1) Focus explicitly on observed student learning “problems” that reflect a gap between what instructors expect students to learn and their actual performance; 2) propose a study to investigate the causes and possible solutions to the problem; 3) present systematic evidence that explains the problem and how to improve student learning; 4) culminate in a scholarly product that can be peer reviewed.

3. Professional Development Grant: These grants support instructors to develop expertise or projects that enhance the quality of undergraduate and/or graduate academics at UWL. The grants may support activities during the academic year and summer. Projects may involve multiple applicants. Professional development projects typically are one of two types: 1) short-duration projects (e.g., attendance at a workshop on teaching in one’s discipline); or 2) longer, ongoing projects (e.g., participation in a faculty seminar for a semester) that expand the training of the applicant in their area of expertise, and can be translated to the classroom or other areas of undergraduate and/or graduate academics.

Deadline: September 22, 2017 at noon

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UWL International Program Development Fund

Program contact: Lema Kabashi (lkabashi@uwlax.edu)

Program summary: The grant program focuses on the development of faculty- and staff-led programs (e.g., scoping visits) or faculty exchanges.

Deadline: October 2, 2017

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UWL International Scholarship Grant

Program contact: Provost Office

Program summary: The program supports internationalization of the university through research and other scholarly projects that are international in scope and have the potential to transform the applicant’s research. One of the primary outcomes associated with this program is the support of travel costs to present research at international venues. However, UWL employees may submit proposals associated with conducting scholarly endeavors abroad and/or enhancing their professional development in a manner that maximizes the interaction between faculty/staff and the host culture/community. Proposals must be approved by the department and dean and demonstrate that the university will realize tangible benefits.

Deadline: October 2, 2017

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UWL Visiting Scholar / Artist of Color Program

Program contact: Provost Office

Program summary: The Visiting Scholar/Artist of Color Program supports bringing four or more scholars/artists of color to campus each year. The purpose of a larger number of shorter visits (rather than semester-long programs) is to increase the program’s visibility on campus and increase the potential representation of individuals across the university. Members of UWL faculty and academic staff may nominate individuals to visit campus during the academic year. A primary goal is significant interaction with students as well as faculty and staff by the visiting scholar/artist. Travel costs and honoraria may be requested in the grant.

Deadline: July 10, 2017 (for fall semester scholars)

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Grants 101

The Benefits of Volunteering on a Review Panel

Recently, UWL hosted National Science Foundation (NSF) Program Officer Dr. Kathleen McCloud, who discussed grant opportunities for Predominantly Undergraduate Institutions (PUI). In her presentation, Dr. McCloud discussed grant writing best practices (e.g., reading the solicitation, contacting the program officer, having someone with grant experience read the proposal before submission). One additional suggestion that Dr. McCloud made that I want to discuss further in this Grants 101 is volunteering to be an NSF peer reviewer. The benefits of becoming a NSF reviewer include “gain[ing] firsthand knowledge of the peer review process; learn[ing] about common problems with proposals; discover[ing] strategies to write strong proposals; and, through serving on a panel, meet[ing] colleagues and NSF program officers managing programs related to your interests” (NSF). NSF states that the “success of the peer review process…depends on the willingness of qualified reviewers like you to share your time and expertise.”

To gain some insight into this experience, I interviewed Associate Professor Taviare Hawkins (Physics), who recently served as a peer reviewer for an NSF panel. Hawkins had an interest in targeting her proposals for a particular panel. The first step was to talk to the program officer of the directorate and program where she thought her own work would fit in order to learn more about the types of projects deemed favorable by peer reviewers, as well as seeing firsthand what a well-written proposal looks like.

Hawkins’s research focuses on the interdisciplinary problem of determining the mechanical (bending) properties of protein filaments inside cells, the microtubules. She and her collaborators “want to quantify their flexibility in various conditions, in the presence of drugs and/or other associated proteins.” Her intended research for NSF funding focuses on post-translational modification (PTM). To summarize, Hawkins explains that “PTMs are markers of microtubule stability in cells. They are important for microtubule-based signaling, and have been shown to affect the binding of microtubule-associated proteins to tubulin; however, there is a gap in our understanding as to whether tubulin PTMs affects the mechanical properties of tubulin dimer and ultimately the microtubule polymer. Through a combined experimental and modeling approaches, we would like to uncover the mechanisms by which PTMs can alter the mechanical properties of tubulin and ultimately microtubules.”

While Hawkins had previously served on grant review panels for private foundations or university-wide programs, her experiences were limited to one-day panels that required a lot of fast-paced work to review, discuss, and decide which grants were worthy of funding. For NSF, Hawkins was required to read and score the applications (up to 6 for her group) before meeting with the panel to discuss. While every panel has its own rhythm, Hawkins quickly noticed that the NSF panel was different from the previous ones she had served on. Specifically, 1) since the directorate was multidisciplinary, she was given the opportunity to access all the proposals to see which ones she felt comfortable reviewing; 2) the process the panel used to decide on which grants should be discussed and reviewed by the larger group was based on a minimum threshold score by the initial reviewing group, and then only the ones which met the minimum would be presented, discussed, and reviewed by the entire group; and 3) the panel, made up of many experienced reviewers, used an “intangible formula” to identify if the narrative had the “ingredients” of a successful proposal.

For Hawkins, the benefits of the NSF panel review experience included gaining a better understanding of what her NSF program expects and defines as a successful proposal. After her experience, she feels more confident and better prepared to submit a proposal to NSF. Overall, Hawkins believes there is always a lesson to be learned in the panel review, whether you are new to grant writing or are a veteran grant writer.

Hawkins’s last thoughts and recommendations to all grant writers are to: 1) work with the grants office; 2) submit a one-page summary to the program officer to make sure you are writing to the right directorate for your research; 3) identify potential collaborators before you begin writing your grant; and 4) write in a way that is accessible to a larger scientific community (since you never know exactly who will be reading your proposal).

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Participant Support Costs: What’s Allowable?

A common question we receive is how to categorize students who will be working on grant-funded projects, particularly for NSF or NIH grants: “In my budget, should I include students under the ‘Personnel’ or the ‘Participant Support Costs’ section?” The answer is the same as it is for many questions in our office: “It depends.” While the name “participant support costs” suggests that students may naturally fall under this section as they are participating on a grant, agencies have specific definitions and rules about when and where to include students in a budget.

For example, the NSF Proposal & Award Policies & Procedures Guide (PAPPG) distinguishes participant support costs from student employees as follows:

  • Participant support costs: “direct costs such as stipends or subsistence allowances, travel allowances, and registration fees paid to or on behalf of participants or trainees (but not employees) in connection with NSF-sponsored conferences or training projects”
  • Student employees: “Student employees are compensated for services rendered and their level of compensation is tied to the number of hours worked. Participant support costs should be used to defray the costs of students participating in a conference or training activity related to the project.”

As an example, NSF’s Research Experiences for Undergraduate Research (REU) program is intended to provide educational training experiences for students, and any funds related to their participation should be included in the participant support costs section.

When it comes to budgeting for students on a grant, the answer of where to include them comes down to what their intended role in the project will be: Is their main purpose to participate in an educational/training capacity (as a participant), or to work on the project as a fellow researcher/research assistant (as an employee)? This should inform how their role is written in the application narrative and budget justification. ORSP can help guide how student involvement is described in an application so that students’ roles are clearly defined.

Additional questions about what is and is not allowable under the participant support costs section are included in the source link below. If you have any questions about budgeting for students on your grants, please contact ORSP.

Source: NSF Proposal & Award Policy Newsletter

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Grant News, May 2017

Latest News

NIH Proposes Metric for Limiting Total Grant Support per Researcher

Latest Federal Spending Update

Applications for Regional Economic Development Programs Now Being Accepted

ACLS Receives $8 Million Grant to Support Humanities Fellowships & Scholarships

NSB Releases Interactive Brief on Careers of STEM PhDs

Recent Submissions & Awards

UWL & UW System Grants

UWL Teaching & Learning Grants

UWL Visiting Scholar/ Artist of Color Program

External Grants

Grants listed below require the institutional GRC log-in to access. If you need the GRC log-in, please see the newsletter in your UWL inbox or contact ORSP.

Arts / Humanities / International

Japan-United States Friendship Commission
John F. Kennedy Library Foundation
 Longview Foundation
National Endowment for the Arts
National Endowment for the Humanities
Russell Sage Foundation
The Library of Congress
United States-Japan Foundation

Education / Economic and Community Development

American College Personnel Association
American Institute for Economic Research
Grant (William T.) Foundation
Kellogg (W.K.) Foundation
Koch (Charles G.) Charitable Foundation
 Kresge Foundation
Sociological Initiatives Foundation
Spencer Foundation
State Justice Institute

Health

Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality
Burroughs Wellcome Fund
Foundation for Physical Therapy
Harry Frank Guggenheim Foundation
Lung Cancer Research Foundation
Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute
Retirement Research Foundation
Robert Wood Johnson Foundation
 U.S. Department of Defense

 Science / Technology / Engineering / Math

Leakey (L.S.B.) Foundation
National Aeronautics and Space Administration
National Fish and Wildlife Foundation
National Research Council
National Science Foundation
North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO)
U.S. Department of Agriculture
U.S. Department of Defense

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Latest News

NIH Proposes Metric for Limiting Total Grant Support per Researcher

NIH has seen remarkable strides in innovative basic, translational, and applied research, as well as strides in funding new and mid-career faculty. However, NIH has also noted a number of concerning trends in its grant funding, such as 40% of funding being directed towards 10% of grant recipients; a significant amount of funds going to a limited number of institutions; funding for early-career investigators remaining flat while mid-career investigators’ funding rates decline; and lower productivity levels on larger grants (such as R01 awards).

To address these concerns, NIH is proposing to implement a new measure that will limit the total grant support that can be awarded to a single principal investigator. The proposed metric for doing so is the Grant Support Index (GSI), previously called the Research Commitment Index.  The GSI “assigns a point value to [an investigator’s] various kinds of grants based on type, complexity, and size. Applications for NIH funding that will support researchers who have GSIs over 21 (the equivalent of 3 single-PI R01 awards) will be expected to include a plan in their applications for how they would adjust those researchers’ existing grant load to be within the GSI limits if their application is awarded” (“New NIH Approach to Grant Funding Aimed at Optimizing Stewardship of Taxpayer Dollars“). It is expected that the GSI limit would affect about 6% of grantees; however, this would, in turn, “free up about 1,600 new awards [annually] to broaden the pool of investigators conducting NIH research.”

Source: National Institutes of Health

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Latest Federal Spending Update

President Trump has signed a FY17 spending bill into law that helped to avoid a major government shutdown. This 2017 appropriations bill will fund the government until September 30.

While initial discussions suggested substantial cuts, and even eliminations, to several federal agencies, the results of the appropriations are hopeful. Discretionary funding to the Department of Education went down slightly, totaling $68.24 billion for FY17 ($60 million less than FY16). Funding for the arts and humanities via federal agencies, such as the National Endowment for the Humanities and the National Endowment for the Arts,  were initially rumored to be eliminated with the FY18 budget. However, funding for the arts and humanities slightly increased about $2 million from FY16, totaling $149.85 million. Likewise, the Institute of Museum & Library Sciences, also included in the group of potential agencies to be eliminated, received a slight increase in funding of $1 million (totaling $231 million).

Science agencies fared very well in the 2017 appropriations bill. Agencies such as the National Science Foundation (NSF), NASA, Department of Energy, and the National Institutes of Health (NIH) received varying levels of funding increases. The Department of Defense (DOD) received the largest percentage increase in funding, increasing 7.5% over FY16. All increases under the DOD appropriation went towards “applied research and Advanced Technology Development efforts. Basic foundational research throughout DoD lost 1.4% of its total funding, or about $33 million (GRC GrantWeek).

Source: GRC GrantWeek

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Applications for Regional Economic Development Programs Now Being Accepted

​The Economic Development Administration (EDA) is accepting solicitations for the Regional Innovation Strategies (RIS) program. RIS is a nationwide competition that consists of two distinct grant programs, both designed to spur innovation capacity-building activities. The i6 Challenge makes small, targeted, high-impact investments to support start-up creation, innovation, and commercialization by funding Proof-of-Concept Centers, the expansion of existing centers, and later-stage Commercialization Centers. Seed Fund Support Grants provide funding for technical assistance to support feasibility, planning, formation, or the launch of cluster-based seed capital funds that will support innovative start-ups.

According to EDA reports, i6 Challenge program grantees have raised $166 million in private investments, SBIR funding, grants, and loans, assisting more than 1,000 entrepreneurs and innovators and creating 950 full-time jobs. Meanwhile, Seed Fund Support program grantees have raised $11 million in seed capital funding and made 34 investments totaling $3.4 million in early-stage companies. This amounts to $1.30 of additional investment for every federal dollar requested, and nearly 1,000 newly created jobs, according to the EDA.

Source: GRC GrantWeek


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ACLS Receives $8 Million Grant to Support Humanities Fellowships & Scholarships

The American Council of Learned Societies (ACLS) recently received a $8 million grant from the Andrew Mellon Foundation to support fellowships and scholarships in the humanities. ACLS’s mission focuses on “the advancement of humanistic studies in all fields of learning in the humanities and the social sciences and the maintenance and strengthening of relations among the national societies devoted to such studies.” ACLS traditionally funds research fellowships in the humanities and social sciences. The new funding will support growth in three priority areas:

1) Increasing the scope of ACLS fellowship programs, which currently award more than $18 million to humanities scholars in annual, peer-reviewed competitions;

2) enabling the pursuit of new initiatives to enhance research support for faculty at teaching-intensive institutions; and

3) building capacity for ACLS program administration and analysis.

Sources: GRC Grantweek and ACLS

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NSB Releases Interactive Brief on Careers of STEM PhDs

The National Science Foundation’s (NSF) National Science Board (NSB) has issued a policy brief that summarizes data on science, engineering, and health (SEH) doctorate holders. In particular, the data shows the career trajectories, job satisfaction, and industry presence of those who have earned their doctorates in SEH disciplines. The brief presents an interactive infographic that shows “proportions of graduates entering business, government, and academic sectors and how career trajectories progress.” Its overall findings are as follows:

  1. There has been a more than 50% increase in the number of SEH doctorates over the past 20 years—outpacing the academic job market.
  2.  Most SEH doctoral graduates work in industries other than academia—“a sign that an SEH degree is a launching point for a variety of careers pathways.”
  3. The bulk of respondents report a very high degree of career satisfaction.

More information can be found at the link below.

Sources: National Science Foundation and GRC Grantweek

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Recent Submissions



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Recent Awards

 

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UWL & UW System Grants

UWL Teaching & Learning Grants

Program contact: UWL Center for Advancing Teaching & Learning (CATL)

Program summary: CATL Teaching & Learning Grants support projects that investigate how students learn and how teaching affects student thinking, learning, and behavior. There are three types of grants available under this funding opportunity:

1. Lesson Study Grants support instructors to undertake a lesson study during the academic year. Lesson study is classroom inquiry in which several instructors jointly design, teach, observe, analyze, and refine a single class lesson in one of their courses. The goal of a lesson study is to better understand how students learn and to use that information to improve teaching.

2. Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL) Grants support projects that examine a significant learning issue or problem in one’s field, subject area, or course–e.g., why students have difficulty learning certain concepts or skills, difficulty applying knowledge and skills to new circumstances, achievement gaps among groups of students, and so on.

3. Course-Embedded Undergraduate Research Grants support the development of novel course-embedded undergraduate research and creative activities. Examples of novel research or creative projects could include working on a project for a client (the client could be on or off-campus) or helping students design and implement a project of their own.

Deadline: June 19, 2017 at noon

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UWL Visiting Scholar / Artist of Color Program

Program contact: UWL Provost Office, provost@uwlax.edu

Program summary: The Visiting Scholar/Artist of Color Program supports bringing four or more scholars/artists of color to campus each year. The purpose of a larger number of shorter visits (rather than semester-long programs) serves to increase the program’s visibility on campus and increase the potential representation of individuals across the university. Members of UWL faculty and academic staff may nominate individuals to visit campus during the academic year. A primary goal is significant interaction with students as well as faculty and staff by the visiting scholar/artist. Travel costs and honoraria may be requested in the grant.

Deadline: July 10, 2017 (fall semester scholars)

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