Grant News, July 2018

Latest News

UWL Fringe Benefit Rates Updated for FY2019

NEH Humanities Summer Stipends: UWL NOIs due Aug. 3

WiSys Technology & Science Symposium July 30-31 at UW-Parkside

IMLS Opens FY19 Competitions for Library Programs

NSF Dear Colleague Letter: STEM Education for the Future

Recent Submissions & Awards

UWL Grants

UWL Academic Staff Professional Development Grant

UWL Faculty Development Grant

UWL Faculty Research Grant

UWL International Program Development Fund

UWL International Scholarship Grant

External Grants

Most grants listed below require the institutional GRC log-in to access. If you need the GRC log-in, please see the newsletter in your UWL inbox or contact ORSP.

Local/Regional Grants

Wisconsin Humanities Council

Arts/Humanities/International

Alexander von Humboldt Foundation
American Council of Learned Societies (humanities & humanities-related social sciences)
Chiang Ching-kuo Foundation (Chinese studies)
College Art Association
Millard Meiss Publication Grants-Sep 15 (book-length scholarly manuscripts in art history, visual studies, or related subjects)
J.M. Kaplan Fund
John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation
National Endowment for the Arts
National Archives and Records Administration
National Endowment for the Humanities
Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study
 Fellowship Program-Sep 13 (creative arts, humanities, social sciences, and natural science & math)

Education/Economic and Community Development

Calvin K. Kazanjian Economics Foundation, Inc.
Kellogg (W.K.) Foundation
Grants Program-Applications accepted at any time (educated/healthy children, racial equity, civic engagement, and secure families)
Lumina Foundation for Education, Inc.
     Grants Program-Sep 29 (increasing access to post-secondary education)
Sloan (Alfred P.) Foundation
Grants Program-LOIs accepeted any time (STEM, economics, higher education, digital technology, public understanding of science, technology & economics, working longer, and energy & environment)
State Justice Institute
     SJI Grant Programs-Aug 1 (improving judicial administration of state courts)
US Department of Education (ED), Institute of Education Sciences (IES)

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Health

Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ)
ASPEN Rhoads Research Foundation (membership required)
Foundation for Physical Therapy
Ittleson Foundation
Grants Program-Aug 31, 2018 (public policy for AIDS, the environment, and mental health)
Kellogg (W.K.) Foundation
National Institutes of Health (NIH)
Pardee (Elsa U.) Foundation

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Science/Technology/Engineering/Math

American Honda Foundation
Field Museum of Natural History
National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)
National Science Foundation (NSF)
Sloan (Alfred P.) Foundation
Sloan Research Fellowships-Sep 17 (research in chemistry, computer science, mathematics, economics, neuroscience, physics, and computational and evolutionary molecular biology)
US Department of Agriculture (USDA)
AFRI: Foundational Program-Sep 30 (Plant Health and Production and Plant Products; Animal Health and Production and Animal Products; Food Safety, Nutrition, and Health; Bioenergy, Natural Resources, and Environment; Agriculture Systems and Technology; and Agriculture Economics and Rural Communities)
US Department of Defense (DoD)
US Department of Energy (DoE)
Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution
Education Programs for Undergraduates/Graduates-Sep 20 (biology, molecular biology, microbiology, chemistry, engineering, geology, geophysics, mathematics, meteorology, physics)

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Latest News

UWL Fringe Benefit Rates Updated for FY2019

UWL’s fringe benefit rates have been updated for fiscal year (FY) 2018-2019 and are effective as of July 1, 2018. If you are developing an extramural budget, please refer to the updated fringe benefit & indirect cost rate sheet on the ORSP website. The UWL budget helper spreadsheet has also been updated with the new rates and will automatically calculate fringe and indirect costs for you! Contact ORSP with any questions about how the updated fringe rates may affect your project.

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NEH Humanities Summer Stipends: UWL NOIs due Aug. 3

The National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) Summer Stipends program supports individuals pursuing advanced research that is of value to humanities scholars, general audiences, or both. Recipients usually produce articles, monographs, books, digital materials, archaeological site reports, translations, editions, or other scholarly resources. Stipends support full-time work on a humanities project for a period of two months. Projects are supported at any stage of development.

Applicants must be nominated by their institution, and there is a limit of two applicants per institution. Interested individuals should complete a UWL notice of interest (NOI) form and submit it according to the deadline listed below. Before submitting the NOI form, applicants should discuss their project with their department chair and college dean. Submit the completed NOI form to grants@uwlax.edu by the deadline below; include your department chair and college dean in the CC line. ORSP will facilitate review of NOIs, with anticipated notification of nomination by August 17, 2018. Please contact ORSP (grants@uwlax.edu) with questions.

Deadlines: 

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WiSys Science & Technology Symposium July 30-31 at UW-Parkside

Mark your calendar! WiSys’s 11th Annual Science & Technology Symposium (WSTS) will be held at UW-Parkside July 30-31. This two-day event is the year’s signature networking opportunity for University of Wisconsin researchers, students, and industry professionals. The symposium will bring together the brightest minds in the Badger state to facilitate collaborations and celebrate innovation across disciplines. Register on the event website by July 13.

The event features the following:

  • Poster Symposium: Students have the opportunity to share their research with over 200 UW System faculty, administrators, business leaders, and community members. Presenters have chances to win cash prizes and the opportunity to list award-winning research on their resumes. Submit your poster online.
  • Innovation Showcase: Students have the opportunity to showcase innovative, hands-on projects in any academic discipline. Presenters are welcome to demonstrate their project using the following formats: prototype, computer display, application storyboard, etc. Please list any special space requirements on your project submission. WiSys can provide tables and power sources, but student teams will be responsible for providing their own computers, screens, and displays.
  • Networking BanquetThis celebration of innovation will include a banquet dinner, drinks, and opportunities to network with innovators from across the state. An award ceremony will follow to honor the Carl E. Gulbrandsen Innovator of the Year and other impactful work being done in Wisconsin. As always, the cost of the evening networking event is just $15, which includes dinner, refreshments, and special programming. Scholarships from UW System cover the cost of the evening event for all UW students.
  • Faculty Open Mic: Faculty can share their latest research, seek a collaborator, or learn about new tools to enhance learning in the classroom. Each participant will have 5 minutes using 3 slides only. Use this opportunity to spark discussion with other WSTS attendees at the networking break directly following this session.

See the event website to register and for information about the full schedule and hotel reservations.

Source: WiSys

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IMLS Opens FY19 Competitions for Library Programs

The Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) has opened FY 19 competitions for its two flagship library programs: National Leadership Grants for Libraries (NLG-L) and Laura Bush 21st Century Librarian Program (LB21). NLG-L supports projects that address challenges faced by the library and archive fields and that generate results such as new tools, research findings, or models that can be widely used. LB21 supports professional development and training projects for libraries and archives. The programs have three project categories this year: Lifelong Learning, Community Catalysts, and National Digital Infrastructures and Initiatives. For FY 19, the programs will have only one competition instead of the two that were offered in previous years. Required two-page preliminary proposals for both programs are due September 17, 2018.

Webinars, each covering the same material, will be available for potential applicants to learn more about the programs and ask questions of program staff.  The webinars will be held on the following schedule:

  • Tuesday, July 10, 2018, 1:00-2:00 pm CST
  • Wednesday, July 25, 1:00-2:00 pm CST

For information about how to participate in the webinars or to access the webinar recordings, see the IMLS webinar webpage.

Sources: Institute of Museum and Library Sciences and GRC GrantWeek

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NSF Dear Colleague Letter: STEM Education for the Future

On June 11, NSF posted a new Dear Colleague Letter (DCL) that invites researchers to submit proposals to solve educational challenges created by the technology revolution. Specifically, NSF aims “to support STEM educational research and development projects whose results can enable our country to: better prepare its scientific and technical workforce for the future; use technological innovations effectively for education; advance the frontiers of science; and adapt to both new work environments and new education pathways needed to prepare students at all levels for those environments.”

This DCL will support three categories of proposals:

  1. Proposals focused on educational transformation: These proposals will leverage technology, computation and/or big data to develop, implement, and analyze educational interventions designed to prepare a diverse workforce, researchers, and innovators of the future. Proposals that explore how students learn to integrate knowledge across disciplines to solve complex problems fall into this category.
  2. Proposals focused on the science of teaching and learning: These proposals will leverage technology, computation and/or big data to develop, implement, and analyze new tools for assessing and evaluating convergent education strategies that aim to promote student learning at all levels.
  3. Planning grants, Research Coordination Networks, Conference Proposals: These proposals will create communities of STEM educators to address convergent curriculum and pedagogical challenges across disciplinary boundaries brought about by the human-technology frontier, the data revolution, or both.

To determine whether a research topic is within the scope of this DCL, principal investigators are strongly encouraged to contact the cognizant NSF Program Officer(s) of the participating program(s) to which they plan to submit their proposal. The deadlines for each program can be found at this link.

Source: National Science Foundation

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Recent Submissions



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Recent Awards


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UWL Grants

UWL Academic Staff Professional Development Grant

Program contact: Academic Staff Council (ascouncil@uwlax.edu)

Program summary: Academic Staff Professional Development Grants support professional development of academic staff in order to enhance their effectiveness in meeting changing needs and roles in higher education, which should improve program quality and institutional effectiveness. Eligible applicants include all academic staff (instructional/non-instructional) with at least a 0.50 FTE academic year assignment. Opportunities for instructional academic staff should result in increased teaching effectiveness. Opportunities for non-instructional academic staff should strengthen areas of the university which support effective student development, increase the university’s role as a community resource, and support the emphasis on teaching.

Deadline: October 1, 2018 (for activities that occur between November 1-February 28)

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UWL Faculty Development Grant

Program contact: Center for Advancing Teaching & Learning (CATL)

Program summary: Faculty Development Grants support the professional development of faculty and instructional academic staff and projects intended to improve teaching and learning. There are three types of grants:

1. Teaching Innovation Grant:These grants support instructors who want to expand their pedagogical knowledge and expertise. Funds support small-scale projects in which instructors try innovative teaching practices and approaches in their classroom. The innovation can be something completely new, invented by the applicant, or a practice new to the applicant even if the practice itself is not a “new” one in the field of teaching.

2. Scholarship of Teaching & Learning Grant (SoTL): SoTL grants support projects intended to advance teaching through scholarly inquiry into student scholarship, teaching, and learning. Projects should 1) Focus explicitly on observed student learning “problems” that reflect a gap between what instructors expect students to learn and their actual performance; 2) propose a study to investigate the causes and possible solutions to the problem; 3) present systematic evidence that explains the problem and how to improve student learning; 4) culminate in a scholarly product that can be peer reviewed.

3. Professional Development Grant: These grants support instructors to develop expertise or projects that enhance the quality of undergraduate and/or graduate academics at UWL. The grants may support activities during the academic year and summer. Projects may involve multiple applicants. Professional development projects typically are one of two types: 1) short-duration projects (e.g., attendance at a workshop on teaching in one’s discipline); or 2) longer, ongoing projects (e.g., participation in a faculty seminar for a semester) that expand the training of the applicant in their area of expertise, and can be translated to the classroom or other areas of undergraduate and/or graduate academics.

Deadline: September 28, 2018 at noon


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UWL Faculty Research Grant

Program contact: Office of Research & Sponsored Programs

Program summary:  The purpose of the Faculty Research Program is to promote and support scholarly research activities campus-wide. UWL provides funds on a competitive, peer-reviewed basis to eligible faculty, which includes all full-time faculty and instructional academic staff with a continuing appointment. The term “research” is meant to denote investigative activities–i.e., scholarly efforts to advance knowledge, increase skills, and improve understanding in any academic discipline. Projects must demonstrate originality and must yield results which are potentially publishable in a reputable journal, in book form, or through other recognized forms of presentation and dissemination.

Deadline: October 24, 2018 at 4:00 p.m.


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UWL International Program Development Fund

Program contact: International Education & Engagement

Program summary: Through institutional partnerships and other scholarly activities, university faculty and academic staff are connected with other universities and organizations throughout the world. International experiences bring the world to the classroom, enhance research, and assist in preparing students, faculty, and staff in becoming global citizens for the 21st Century. This grant program focuses on the development of faculty- and staff-led programs (e.g., scoping visits) or faculty exchanges.

Deadline: October 1, 2018


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UWL International Scholarship Grant

Program contact: Provost Office

Program summary: The ISG program exists to help support the travel associated with the internationalization of the university. The primary outcome associated with the grant is the support of travel costs to present research at international venues. Successful proposals may also support research and other scholarly projects that are international in scope and have the potential to transform the applicant’s research. However, UWL employees may submit proposals associated with conducting scholarly endeavors abroad in a manner that maximizes the interaction between faculty/staff and the host culture/community. Proposals must be approved by the department and dean and demonstrate that the university will realize tangible benefits.

Deadline: All proposals due to the relevant Dean/Division Head one week prior to the October 1 deadline. Proposals must be submitted to grants@uwlax.edu by the Dean/Division Head by October 1, 2018.

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Grant News, June 2018

Community Connections

World Arts through K/Cultural Engagement (WAKE) (Dr. Rita Chen, Educational Studies)

Foundation Spotlight

Teagle Foundation

Latest News

NEH Humanities Summer Stipends: UWL NOIs due Aug. 3

ED Announces IES Education and Special Education Research Competitions

ED Announces New STEM Apprenticeship Program

Recent Submissions & Awards

UWL Grants

UWL Faculty Development Grant

UWL Visiting Scholar/Artist of Color Program

External Grants

Most grants listed below require the institutional GRC log-in to access. If you need the GRC log-in, please see the newsletter in your UWL inbox or contact ORSP.

Local/Regional Grants

La Crosse Community Foundation
Wisconsin Humanities Council

Arts/Humanities/International

American Musicological Society
Council for International Exchange of Scholars
John F. Kennedy Library Foundation
Institute for Humane Studies
Mockingbird Foundation (music education)
National Endowment for the Arts (NEA)
     Our Town-Aug 9, 2018 (creative place-making)
National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH)
Sage (Russell) Foundation
US Agency for International Development (USAID)

 

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Education/Economic and Community Development

Grant (William T.) Foundation
Harry Frank Guggenheim Foundation (violence, aggression, and dominance from a multi-disciplinary perspective)
Koch (Charles G.) Charitable Foundation
Mott (Charles Stewart) Foundation
Retirement Research Foundation
Sloan (Alfred P.) Foundation
Sociological Initiatives Foundation (linking research to social action)
Spencer Foundation
US Department of Commerce (innovation-based economic development efforts)
US Department of Education
US Department of Justice

 

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Health

ASPEN Rhoads Research Foundation (membership required)
American Heart Association
Pardee (Elsa U.) Foundation
Foundation for Physical Therapy
Ittleson Foundation (public policy for AIDS, the environment, and mental health)
National Institutes of Health (NIH)

 

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Science/Technology/Engineering/Math

Earthwatch Institute
National Research Council
National Science Foundation (NSF)
US Department of Agriculture (USDA)
US Department of Defense

 

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Community Connections: World Arts through K/Cultural Engagement (WAKE) (Dr. Rita Chen, Educational Studies)

Increasing community engagement is one of the pillars of UWL’s strategic plan, outlined as a “key component to our teaching, scholarly, & service mission.” ORSP has the opportunity to work with dedicated faculty and staff as they develop grant applications to serve and give back to our community. In this month’s newsletter, we would like to highlight the success of Dr. Rita Chen (Educational Studies) for her back-to-back successful grant procurement for the World Arts through K/Cultural Engagement (WAKE) program, which has been funded by the Wisconsin Humanities Council (WHC) and the La Crosse Community Foundation Global Awareness Fund.

As a state, Wisconsin’s residents are becoming more diverse. The 2010 US Census shows that Western Wisconsin, in particular, has grown in diversity. This shift can be seen in public school districts, such as La Crosse, Onalaska, West Salem, Sparta, and Arcadia. With diversity increasing in the classrooms, Chen says it is important for teachers to address the needs of the student population through a more globalized education. Two ways that she is helping to address this need is through 1) curriculum development with local schools and 2) piloting of the WAKE program in April 2018.

Since 2014, Chen and UWL teacher candidates under her mentorship have worked with 4th grade teachers and students at Northern Hills Elementary School (Onalaska School District) and a 6th grade teacher at Longfellow Middle School (La Crosse School District). The objectives of this collaboration are to embed 1) the philosophy of teaching for social justice and 2) culturally responsive teaching into the current language arts and social studies curriculum at these schools. Chen and her students have helped these teachers develop critical research activities around multicultural and/or social justice research; these project allowed students to take on “multiple perspectives in viewing the [current societal] problems we are facing, such as poverty, gender bias, gender inequality, technology advancement and its effect, [and] environmental issues (e.g., global warming, deforestation, animal extinction, disappearance of indigenous cultures and languages, etc.).” With the success of this curriculum development in the two school districts, Chen and the group felt it was time to upscale the “impact of the social justice and multicultural projects in the classroom to the entire community” by piloting the WAKE program in April 2018.

The purpose of the WAKE program is to “raise awareness of the diverse cultural heritage located within the La Crosse and Onalaska communities and to unite the community through commonalities associated with each culture.” To raise this awareness, five groups of cultural experts (including individuals from the Native American, Hmong, Latina/o, African-American, and African communities in La Crosse) developed workshops for students and local community members to learn about a significant tradition of each culture. The common theme that united these workshops was the use of performance (e.g., storytelling, dancing, music, etc.) to guide participants in exploring, discussing, and appreciating the common connections that bring us together and unite us as human beings. With the UWL teacher candidates’ help from Chen’s Foundations of Literacy class, the students from the Onalaska and La Crosse School Districts endeavored to take multicultural perspectives when researching and presenting their social justice projects at the WAKE event. These social justice projects allowed parents and community members to learn what students were engaging in academically and to learn about other cultures in their community.

The two successful grants Chen obtained to support the WAKE program underscore not the only the need for this type of cultural programming at the community level, but also the power and importance of community connections between UWL and the school districts with which the campus partners. UWL’s School of Education, Professional, & Continuing Education strives to prepare effective teachers and responsible citizens in a diverse world. The anticipated outcomes of the WAKE event, from Chen’s perspective, were to 1) provide more opportunities for community and cultural groups to share their experiences and develop mutual understanding of human differences, 2) provide cross-cultural communication and education through the performing arts, and 3) plant seeds of acceptance in the minds of young generations to remove exclusive, harmful mentalities and move towards becoming a multilingual and multicultural society. In the end, the WAKE event allowed collaborators, participants, and cultural experts to participate in a “third space” (i.e., a space in which cross-disciplinary relationships and collaborations flourish), which allowed “teachers, students, and students’ families to build a sense of community and co-construct knowledge that is meaningful and accessible to all members in the school community.”

WKBT La Crosse News documented the success of the WAKE event and published the following article highlighting it. Survey results from the pilot program show that the event was successful, and Chen is already planning to reach out to other schools who are interested in hosting a WAKE program for the 2018-2019 school year.

Funded in part by a grant from the Wisconsin Humanities Council, with funds from the National Endowment for the Humanities. Any views, findings, conclusions or recommendations expressed in this project do not necessarily represent those of the National Endowment for the Humanities. The Wisconsin Humanities Council supports and creates programs that use history, culture, and discussion to strengthen community life for everyone in Wisconsin.

The WAKE event is funded in part with grant support from the La Crosse Community Foundation.

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Foundation Spotlight

Teagle Foundation 

The Teagle Foundation’s mission is to promote and enhance liberal arts education, which the foundation holds as fundamental to meaningful work, effective citizenship, and living a full life. The foundation supports research and projects that focus on developing and improving curriculum, pedagogy, and assessment, while simultaneously focusing on quality and cost in the process.

The foundation supports partnerships of 4-6 institutions of higher education that a) explicitly put engaged student learning in the liberal arts at the center of their mission; b) allocate their resources to sustain this mission; c) have stable enrollments and finances; d) achieve good graduation rates, typically 65% or more after six years; and e) systematically assess student progress.

Current Initiatives:

  1. Faculty Planning and Curricular Coherence: This initiative supports efforts for faculty to work together and to create a more coherent and intentional curriculum with goals, pathways, and outcomes that are clear to students and other constituencies with a stake in the future of higher education.
    • Grant amounts range from $100,000-$300,000 over 24-36 months.
    • Foundation contact: Program Director, Loni Bordoloi Pazich (bordoloi@teagle.org)
  2. Liberal Arts and the Professions: This initiative has the goal of embedding liberal arts education throughout the curriculum of undergraduate professional programs by forging links between faculty in the liberal arts and professional fields. Such curricular integration will not only have a positive effect on how students in professional fields pursue their future work, but will also enrich the liberal arts curriculum itself with perspectives that merit sharing beyond the community of professional practitioners.
    • Grant amounts range from $200,000-$300,000 over 24-36 months.
    • Foundation contact: Program Director, Loni Bordoloi Pazich (bordoloi@teagle.org)
  3. Special Projects: The foundation will occasionally make special grants for projects that are aligned with their interests in advancing the liberal arts, broadening access to a liberal arts education, and enhancing student learning, and yet do not fall within the parameters of their formal requests for proposals.

How to apply: Requests for proposals are by invitation only, and they typically reflect a collaboration of 4-6 colleges/universities that exhibit an alignment of priorities and draw participants together as a community of practice. Although partners share goals, their project execution may vary from campus to campus, given their unique contexts.

  • Grantees must first submit a 3-5 page concept paper in response to a current request for proposals (RFP). This concept paper should outline project goals, demonstrate alignment with Teagle’s mission and RFP, and provide an overview of the project description (with an eye towards collaborative learning through a community of practice).
    • The required 4-6 partner institutions should be named in the concept paper.
    • Key questions to keep in mind when developing the concept paper:
      • In what ways will your institution substantively differ or be strengthened as a result of a Teagle grant?
      • How will those substantive changes be sustained beyond the life of a grant?
      • How will the partners benefit from collaborating with one another?

Deadline: Concept papers are considered on a rolling basis. The board of directors reviews grant requests in February, May, and November. If a proposal is invited, program staff will confer with you to determine the appropriate timeline for submitting a full proposal in time for potential review by the board.

Website: http://www.teaglefoundation.org/

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Latest News


NEH Humanities Summer Stipends: UWL NOIs due Aug. 3

The National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) Summer Stipends program supports individuals pursuing advanced research that is of value to humanities scholars, general audiences, or both. Recipients usually produce articles, monographs, books, digital materials, archaeological site reports, translations, editions, or other scholarly resources. Stipends support full-time work on a humanities project for a period of two months. Projects are supported at any stage of development.

Applicants must be nominated by their institution, and there is a limit of two applicants per institution. Interested individuals should complete a UWL notice of interest (NOI) form and submit it according to the deadline listed below. Before submitting the NOI form, applicants should discuss their project with their department chair and college dean. Submit the completed NOI form to grants@uwlax.edu by the deadline below; include your department chair and college dean in the CC line. ORSP will facilitate review of NOIs, with anticipated notification of nomination by August 17, 2018. Please contact ORSP (grants@uwlax.edu) with questions.

Deadlines: 

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ED Announces IES Education and Special Education Research Competitions

Under the Institute of Education Sciences (IES), the US Department of Education (ED) is inviting applications for the Education Research and Special Education Research grant programs.

IES’s research grant programs are designed to provide interested individuals and the general public with reliable and valid information about education practices that support learning and improve academic achievement and access to education opportunities for all students. These interested individuals include parents, educators, students, researchers, and policymakers.

IES’s National Center for Education Research (NCER) will hold five competitions in the following areas:

  • Education Research
  • Education Research and Development Centers
  • Statistical and Research Methodology in Education
  • Partnerships and Collaborations Focused on Problems of Practice or Policy
  • Low-Cost, Short-Duration Evaluations of Education Interventions

IES’s National Center for Special Education Research (NCSER) will hold four competitions in the following areas:

  • Special Education Research
  • Research Training Programs in Special Education
  • Low-Cost, Short-Duration Evaluation of Special Education Interventions
  • Research Networks Focused on Critical Problems of Policy and Practice in Special Education

The following grant programs have an application submission deadline of August 23, 2018. Suggested letters of intent (LOIs) are due June 21, 2018:

  • Education Research (includes 13 programs of research topics; see IES website for details and individual RFPs for each program)
  • Partnerships and Collaborations Focused on Problems of Practice and Policy
  • Research Training Programs in Special Education
  • Special Education Research Grants
  • Statistical and Research Methodology in Education

Additional deadlines for FY19 IES grants can be found on IES’s website. See the Federal Register Notice for further details on funding priorities.

Source: US Department of Education

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ED Announces New STEM Apprenticeship Program

The US Department of Education (ED) has unveiled ​a new program, Pathways to STEM Apprenticeship for High School Career and Technical Education (CTE) Students. The program is designed to support state efforts to expand and improve the transition of high school CTE students to postsecondary education and employment through apprenticeships. While the lead applicants must be a state board or agency, all projects must include at least one postsecondary partner and at least one employer. This competition has one absolute priority that must be addressed by all applicants: Promoting STEM Education, with a Particular Focus on Computer Science.
Approximately five awards of up to $750,000 each are available to support projects lasting up to 36 months. The deadline for the notice of intent (NOI), which is strongly encouraged, is June 18, 2018. The full application is due July 17, 2018.
More information is available in the Federal Register notice and on the ED Perkins Collaborative Resource Network website, which also has details on how to take part in a pre-application webinar to be held June 5, 2018 at 1:00 PM CST.​

Sources: GRC Grantweek and US Department of Education 

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Recent Submissions

junesubs

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Recent Awards


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UWL Grants


UWL Faculty Development Grant

Program contact: Center for Advancing Teaching & Learning (CATL)

Program summary: Faculty Development Grants support the professional development of faculty and instructional academic staff and projects intended to improve teaching and learning. There are three types of grants:

1. Teaching Innovation Grant:These grants support instructors who want to expand their pedagogical knowledge and expertise. Funds support small-scale projects in which instructors try innovative teaching practices and approaches in their classroom. The innovation can be something completely new, invented by the applicant, or a practice new to the applicant even if the practice itself is not a “new” one in the field of teaching.

2. Scholarship of Teaching & Learning Grant (SoTL): SoTL grants support projects intended to advance teaching through scholarly inquiry into student scholarship, teaching, and learning. Projects should 1) Focus explicitly on observed student learning “problems” that reflect a gap between what instructors expect students to learn and their actual performance; 2) propose a study to investigate the causes and possible solutions to the problem; 3) present systematic evidence that explains the problem and how to improve student learning; 4) culminate in a scholarly product that can be peer reviewed.

3. Professional Development Grant: These grants support instructors to develop expertise or projects that enhance the quality of undergraduate and/or graduate academics at UWL. The grants may support activities during the academic year and summer. Projects may involve multiple applicants. Professional development projects typically are one of two types: 1) short-duration projects (e.g., attendance at a workshop on teaching in one’s discipline); or 2) longer, ongoing projects (e.g., participation in a faculty seminar for a semester) that expand the training of the applicant in their area of expertise, and can be translated to the classroom or other areas of undergraduate and/or graduate academics.

Deadline: September 28, 2018 at noon

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UWL Visiting Scholar/Artist of Color Program

Program contact: Provost Office

Program summary: The Visiting Scholar/Artist of Color Program supports bringing four or more scholars/artists of color to campus each year. The purpose of a larger number of shorter visits (rather than semester-long programs) is to increase the program’s visibility on campus and increase the potential representation of individuals across the university. Members of UWL faculty and academic staff may nominate individuals to visit campus during the academic year. A primary goal is significant interaction with students as well as faculty and staff by the visiting scholar/artist. Travel costs and honoraria may be requested in the grant.

Deadline: July 9, 2018 (for fall semester scholars)

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Grant News, May 2018

Community Connections

La Crosse Reads (Kate Parker, English; Bryan Kopp, English/CATL; and Barry McKnight, La Crosse Public Library)

Latest News

FY 2018 NIH Budget Review

Department of Education Releases Final Priorities for Upcoming Discretionary Grants

NIH Launches HEAL Initiative

NSF Receives Increase in Support from Congress

NIH’s Matchmaker Identifies Program Officials in Your Research Area

FY 2017-2018 Third Quarter Awards: A Pictorial Overview

Recent Submissions & Awards

UWL & UW System Grants

UWL Academic Staff Professional Development Grants

UWL Teaching and Learning Grants

UWL International Program Development Fund

UWL International Scholarship Grants

UWL Visiting Scholar/Artist of Color Program

External Grants

Most grants listed below require the institutional GRC log-in to access. If you need the GRC log-in, please see the newsletter in your UWL inbox or contact ORSP.

Local/Regional Grants

La Crosse Community Foundation
Wisconsin Humanities Council

Arts / Humanities / International

American Institute of Indian Studies
Hagley Museum and Library (American economic, business, industrial and technological history)
Japan-United States Friendship Commission
National Archives & Records Administration (NARA)
National Endowment for the Arts (NEA)
Art Works-July 12, 2018 (art creation; public engagement in, lifelong learning in, and community development through the arts)
       Our Town-Aug 9, 2018 (creative place-making)
National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH)
Common Heritage-May 31, 2018 (events devoted to digitization of community cultural heritage materials)
National Trust for Historic Preservation
National Trust Preservation Fund-Jun 1, 2018 (preservation planning & education projects)
The Library of Congress
Kluge Fellowships-July 15, 2018 (Kluge Center residential research support in humanities & social sciences)
United States-Japan Foundation
Grant Programs-July 15, 2018 (communication/public opinion; pre-college education curriculum development & teacher training; US-Japan policy)

Education / Economic and Community Development

American College Personnel Association
    Grants Program-July 1, 2018 (student affairs)
Economic History Association
Open Society Institute
Open Society Fellowships-July 15, 2018 (human rights, government transparency, access to information and justice, and promotion of civil society & social inclusion)

Health

Lung Cancer Research Foundation
National Ataxia Foundation
    Research Grants-July 16, 2018 (required LOI)
National Institutes of Health (NIH)
National Multiple Sclerosis Society

Science / Technology / Engineering / Math

American Heart Association (Membership required)
Civilian Research and Development Foundation Global
Leakey (L.S.B.) Foundation
General Research Grants-July 15, 2018 (research on human origins & evolution in multiple disciplines)
National Aeronautics & Space Administration (NASA)
National Science Foundation (NSF
Partnership for Clean Competition
Grants and Fellowships-July 1, 2018 (research in anti-doping sphere)
Smithsonian Institution
US Department of Defense (DOD)
DARPA: Defense Sciences Office-Multiple deadlines based on office (research & development in variety of subjects in fundamental science & innovation)
Distributed Operations (DistrO)-July 13, 2018 (planning & assessment technology development; distributed integration and experimentation)

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Community Connections: La Crosse Reads

Increasing community engagement is one of the pillars of UWL’s strategic plan, outlined as a “key component to our teaching, scholarly, and service mission.” ORSP has the amazing opportunity to work with dedicated faculty and staff as they develop grant applications to serve our community. In this month’s newsletter, we would like to highlight the success of Dr. Kate Parker (English), Dr. Bryan Kopp (English/CATL), and Barry McKnight (La Crosse Public Library) for their National Endowment for the Arts (NEA)-funded Big Read project, La Crosse Reads.

The NEA specifically allocates funding for the Big Read grant competition yearly. In collaboration with Arts Midwest, the goal of the Big Read is to broaden “our understanding of our world, our communities, and ourselves through the joy of sharing a good book. Showcasing a diverse range of contemporary titles that reflect many different voices and perspectives, the NEA Big Read aims to inspire conversation and discovery” (NEA Big Read). According to Parker, the UWL English department’s intention to bring the Big Read to La Crosse was to “build a grassroots, community reading program that focused on social justice issues facing our community” that was also “portable (moving between programming partners each year) and collaborative (developing equitable relationships among the partners).” With this idea in mind, the department voted to submit an application in the fall of 2014, emphasizing a strong partnership with the La Crosse Public Library that would allow the program to engage more community members. The initial grant was not funded; however, this did not stop Parker and Kopp from furthering their collaborative efforts to build a stronger application. Partnering with the La Crosse Public Library, La Crosse County Jail, and WTC, the La Crosse Reads project was funded for the 2017 year to support programming around Ernest J. Gaines’s novel, A Lesson Before Dying (details can be found on the La Crosse Reads website). For the 2018 year, the La Crosse Public Library took the lead on the Big Read grant, and the book chosen is Emily St. John Mandel’s Station Eleven (details on the book and community events can be found here).

Back-to-back funding of La Crosse Reads shows not only the dedication to writing and program development between UWL and the La Crosse Public Library, but also their determination to broaden collaboration and conversation on social justice topics that concern the community. The internet allows us to easily find information about issues that concern us, but Parker says, “Reading and discussing works of literature allows community members to approach social problems in thoughtful and even unexpected ways… Sitting down over a book opens up different sorts of questions, allows for different kinds of conversations.” Furthermore, collaborating with different organizations opens the discussions on the books’ themes to include individuals’ varying perspectives based on background and experiences. Additional partners on these grants include Viterbo University, Gundersen Lutheran, the People’s Food Co-Op, Metre Design, La Crosse public high schools, the Mayor’s Office and Human Rights Commission, Project PROVEN, Downtown Mainstreet, Inc., the Franciscan Spirituality Center, and the Franciscan Hospitality House.

The overwhelming success of La Crosse Reads has inspired the UWL group and the La Crosse Public Library to broaden their outreach into other community reading projects. The Little Read program (funded by the La Crosse Community Foundation) engaged La Crosse community children in age-appropriate conversations related to topics discussed with A Lesson Before Dying. Parker, Kopp, and Kelly Sultzbach (English) also led a UWL Jail Literacy Program that was part of the 2017 collaborations and events. For this event, La Crosse Reads brought nationally recognized poet, activist, and Yale-educated lawyer R. Dwayne Betts. For the participating faculty, including Parker and Kopp, the most amazing part about Betts’s visit was his willingness to schedule a 2 ½ hour morning session to visit 14 male inmates in the local jail as part of the literacy program. The broader impacts of these events on the community are numerous. The intended grassroots efforts of the La Crosse Reads group has led not only to the reading and sharing of literature with peers and community members, but has also provided a welcoming space that encourages inquiry and engagement with others to hear and learn about new perspectives on topics that impact the everyday lives of our people.
NEABigRead-Color-516-x-500-150x150

NEA Big Read is a program of the National Endowment for the Arts in partnership with Arts Midwest. The NEA Big Read broadens our understanding of our world, our communities, and ourselves through the joy of sharing a good book. Showcasing a diverse range of contemporary titles that reflect many different voices and perspectives, the NEA Big Read aims to inspire conversation and discovery.

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Latest News

FY 2018 NIH Budget Review

Despite proposed budget cuts to the National Institutes of Health (NIH), the FY 2018 appropriations bill shows substantial gains for the nation’s biomedical research agency. The budget ensures continued funding for institutions’ facilities & administrative costs along with support for advances in cancer research to include (1) Cancer Moonshot, an initiative dedicated to increase access to cancer screening and treatment; and (2) the Gabriella Miller Kids First Pediatric Research Program (Kids First), a research data resource designed to improve the study of childhood cancers and/or structural birth defects.

In fact, NIH anticipates a $3 billion increase–to total $37 billion in FY 2018– with allocation boosts in the following research areas:

  • $1.8 billion (+$414 million) for Alzheimer’s disease research;
  • $500 million for a new initiative to research opioid addiction, development of opioids alternatives, pain management, and addiction treatment;
  • $400 million (+$140 million) for the Brain Research through Application of Innovative Neurotechnologies (BRAIN) initiative;
  • $290 million (+$60 million) for the All of Us research initiative;
  • $10 million (+$8 million) for regenerative medicine research;
  • $100 million (+$40 million) for research to develop a universal flu vaccine;
  • $513 million (+50 million) for research on combating antibiotic-resistant bacteria;
  • $543 million (+27 million) for Clinical and Translational Science Awards;
  • $357.6 million (+$17 million) for Institutional Development Awards (IDeA); and
  • a new multi-year Down Syndrome research initiative that will expand NIH support for research on Trisomy 21 and related diseases and disorders.

Source: GRC GrantWeek


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Department of Education Releases Final Priorities for Upcoming Discretionary Grants

The US Department of Education (ED) has released a statement of their upcoming funding priorities for discretionary grants. Each of these eleven final priorities are approved to appear in upcoming ED solicitations as one of the following priority types: (1) Absolute Priority, which all applicants must address it; (2) Competitive Preference Priority, which provides an advantage to applications and which GRC recommends all applicants address; and (3) Invitational Priority, which ED encourages applicants to address even though these do not provide any competitive advantage. Additional comments and detailed descriptions on each priority can be found in the Federal Register:

Priority 1—Empowering Families and Individuals To Choose a High-Quality Education That Meets Their Unique Needs
Priority 2—Promoting Innovation and Efficiency, Streamlining Education With an Increased Focus on Improving Student Outcomes, and Providing Increased Value to Students and Taxpayers
Priority 3—Fostering Flexible and Affordable Paths to Obtaining Knowledge and Skills
Priority 4—Fostering Knowledge and Promoting the Development of Skills That Prepare Students To Be Informed, Thoughtful, and Productive Individuals and Citizens
Priority 5—Meeting the Unique Needs of Students and Children With Disabilities and/or Those With Unique Gifts and Talents
Priority 6—Promoting Science, Technology, Engineering, or Math (STEM) Education, with a Particular Focus on Computer Science
Priority 7—Promoting Literacy projects that are designed to address one or more of the following priority areas:
Priority 8—Promoting Effective Instruction in Classrooms and Schools
Priority 9—Promoting Economic Opportunity
Priority 10—Protecting Freedom of Speech and Encouraging Respectful Interactions in a Safe Educational Environment
Priority 11—Ensuring That Service Members, Veterans, and Their Families Have Access to High-Quality Educational Options


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NIH Launches HEAL Initiative

In 2018, NIH is launching the Helping to End Addiction Long-Term (HEAL) Initiative, “an aggressive, trans-agency effort to speed scientific solutions to stem the national opioid public health crisis.” With the budget increase from Congress ($1.1 billion for FY18), NIH will direct additional funding towards research on opioid addiction, misuse, and pain.

With this funding, NIH intends to build upon previous successful opioid research and invest in projects that will (1) prevent addiction through enhanced pain management and (2) improve treatments for opioid misuse disorder and addiction, which in turn will inform NIH and the public on treatment best practices. Examples of how NIH will meet these goals can be found at this link.

Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH)


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NSF Receives Increase in Support from Congress

The National Science Foundation (NSF) received a 4% increase in total funding; specifically, $6,334,476,000 will be allocated for research and related activities. Traditionally, NSF has discretion on how it will distribute the funding. Significant areas of impact for the upcoming year include:

Sources: GRC GrantWeek and American Institute of Physics


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NIH’s Matchmaker Identifies Program Officials in Your Research Area

NIH’s Research Portfolio Online Reporting Tool (RePORT) allows PIs to access NIH-funded research, as well as to use the Matchmaker function, launched in 2015, to identify up to the top 100 most-similar NIH-funded projects. Matchmaker was recently updated to allow users to identify “NIH program officials whose portfolios include projects in [their] research area.” The first screenshot below shows the initial page where you enter your search term(s) into Matchmaker. From there, you can choose to either search by similar projects or by similar program officials.

The results provided (see the sample screenshot below) will include a list of program officials (not pictured here), their emails, associated institutes/centers, and the number of project associated with the research terms included in the initial search, as well as a visual breakdown of funding by institutes/centers and funding mechanisms (e.g., R01, R21, R15, K01).

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FY 2017-2018 Third Quarter Awards: A Pictorial Overview

FY18 Q3 Awards by College Division

FY18 Q3 Awards by Source

FY18 Q3 Major Funding Sources

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Recent Submissions


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Recent Awards

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UWL & UW System Grants

UWL Academic Staff Professional Development Grants

Program contact: Matthew Schneider (mschneider@uwlax.edu)

Program summary: Academic Staff Professional Development grants support professional development for UWL academic staff. Such opportunities enable staff to increase their effectiveness by expanding knowledge in their areas of expertise, refining and developing skills, and enhancing staff morale. All academic staff (instructional/non-instructional) with at least a 0.50 FTE academic year appointment are eligible. Examples of eligible activities include professional training and development, participation in a conference or workshop, bringing speakers to campus to provide presentations to academic staff, etc.

Deadline: June 1, 2018 (for proposed activities occurring between July 1 and October 31, 2018)

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UWL Teaching & Learning Grants

Program contact: Center for Advancing Teaching & Learning (CATL)

Program summary: These grants support projects that investigate how students learn and how teaching affects student thinking, learning, and behavior. Applicants for Teaching & Learning Grants must be full-time tenure-track faculty or instructional academic staff during the period of the grant project. There are three types of grants available:

  • Lesson Study Grants: Classroom inquiry in which several instructors jointly design, teach, observe, analyze, and refine a single class lesson in one of their courses. The goal is to better understand how students learn, and to use that information to improve teaching.
  • Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL) Grants: Support classroom research in which instructors investigate teaching and learning in their own classes. Grants fund projects that examine a significant learning issue or problem in one’s field, subject area, or course–e.g., why students have difficulty learning certain concepts or skills, difficulty applying knowledge and skills to new circumstances, achievement gaps among groups of students, and so on. SoTL grants support projects carried out during the academic year.
  • Course-Embedded Undergraduate Research Grants: These grants are designed to help instructors develop novel course-embedded undergraduate research and creative activities.

Deadline: June 1, 2018

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UWL International Program Development Fund

Program contact: Rose Brougham (rbrougham@uwlax.edu)

Program summary: Through institutional partnerships and other scholarly activities, university faculty and academic staff are connected with other universities and organizations throughout the world. International experiences bring the world to the classroom, enhance research, and assist in preparing students, faculty, and staff in becoming global citizens for the 21st century. The grant program focuses on the development of faculty- and staff-led programs (e.g., scoping visits) or faculty exchanges.

Deadline: May 7, 2018

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UWL International Scholarship Grants

Program contact: UWL Provost Office

Program summary: The program supports internationalization of the university through research and other scholarly projects that are international in scope and have the potential to transform the applicant’s research. One of the primary outcomes associated with this program is the support of travel costs to present research at international venues. However, UWL employees may submit proposals associated with conducting scholarly endeavors abroad and/or enhancing their professional development in a manner that maximizes the interaction between faculty/staff and the host culture/community. Proposals must be approved by the department and dean and demonstrate that the university will realize tangible benefits.

Deadline: May 7, 2018

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UWL Visiting Scholar/Artist of Color Program

Program contact: Provost Office

Program summary: The Visiting Scholar/Artist of Color Program supports bringing four or more scholars/artists of color to campus each year. The purpose of a larger number of shorter visits (rather than semester-long programs) serves to increase the program’s visibility on campus and increase the potential representation of individuals across the university. Members of UWL faculty and academic staff may nominate individuals to visit campus during the academic year. A primary goal is significant interaction with students as well as faculty and staff by the visiting scholar/artist. Travel costs and honoraria may be requested in the grant.

Deadline: July 9, 2018 at 4:00 pm (for fall semester scholars/artists)

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Grant News, April 2018

Community Connections

The Big Eagle Sales Competition (Stacy Trisler, Marketing)

Latest News

Federal Legislative Update: FY18 Omnibus Spending Bill

IMLS Offers New Funding for Community Engagement

Save the Date: WiSys Science & Technology Symposium July 30-31 at UW-Parkside

Save the Date: April 5 Grant Writing Webinar

Recent Submissions & Awards

UWL & UW System Grants

UWL Academic Staff Professional Development Grants

UWL Teaching and Learning Grants

UWL International Program Development Fund

UWL International Scholarship Grants

UWL Visiting Scholar/Artist of Color Program

UW System Ideadvance Seed Fund

External Grants

Most grants listed below require the institutional GRC log-in to access. If you need the GRC log-in, please see the newsletter in your UWL inbox or contact ORSP.

Local/Regional Grants

Arts Midwest
Bader Foundation
La Crosse Community Foundation
US Bank Foundation
Wisconsin Arts Board
Wisconsin Historical Society
Wisconsin Humanities Council

Arts / Humanities / International

Hagley Museum and Library (American economic, business, industrial and technological history)
Longview Foundation
National Archives & Records Administration
National Endowment for the Arts (NEA)
National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH)
National Trust for Historic Preservation
US Department of State
Education/Economic and Community Development
Dollar General Literacy Foundation
Kellogg (W.K.) Foundation (Children, Family, and Community Equity/Engagement)
Institute of International Education
National Education Association (NEA) Foundation (Global Achievement, Student Achievement, and Learning & Leadership Grants)
US Department of Justice

Health

Agency for Healthcare Research & Quality (AHRQ)
Craig H. Neilsen Foundation
Gerber Foundation (nutrition-related infant health with broad applicability)
Mitsubishi Electric America Foundation
National Institutes of Health (NIH)
Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI)

Science/Technology/Engineering/Math

American Astronomical Society
Environmental Research & Education Foundation
National Science Foundation (NSF)
Office of the Director of National Intelligence
US Department of Agriculture (USDA)
US Department of Defense
US Department of Energy
US Department of Justice

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Community Connections: The Big Eagle Sales Competition

Increasing community engagement is one of the pillars of UWL’s strategic plan, outlined as a “key component to our teaching, scholarly, & service mission.” In ORSP, we are at the front lines as faculty and staff come together to develop, plan, and write grants that will help them connect to and serve the broader community. With all the community projects that come through our office and via word-of-mouth, we wanted to take a moment each month to bring attention to the great collaborations that significantly impact our students and the surrounding community. In this month’s newsletter, we want to draw attention to Marketing Instructor Stacy Trisler and the work she has done with students and businesses for the annual Big Eagle Sales Competition.

Each year, the Big Eagle Sales Competition provides marketing majors the opportunity to practice their skills at professional selling. Community business professionals sponsor the event and participate as judges and “buyers” for the students, who compete to make a sale to their respective client. Students receive materials on their case study ahead of time, giving them the ability to build a persuasive case based on established research, analysis, and sales best practices. This year’s case study centered on Hormel’s Natural Choice snacking items. At the competition, contestants have 20 minutes to present their finalized sales pitch to the buyers, who “evaluate students on all elements of the sales call including their ability to communicate effectively and act in a professional manner.” Following each presentation, contestants are provided a 30-minute debriefing session with one of their judges. Trisler states, “This one-on-one time with a sales professional is highly valued by our students and their faculty coaches. Students also will receive their evaluation sheets and a link to a digital recording of their presentations.”

Students and local businesses mutually recognize the broader impacts of the Big Eagle Sales Competition. Businesses, who connect with Trisler through previous sales competitions, class presentations, and networking, see the annual sales competition as an opportunity to meet, mingle with, and recruit talented marketing students from the La Crosse area. Trisler says that students who move on to the next stage of competition at regional and national events “typically receive job offers, with most accepting positions.” For example, a long-term sponsor of the UWL competition, Inland Packaging, has recruited up to five students to work for the company upon graduation. Whether participating at the local, regional, or national level, student participants believe this opportunity has had a significant impact on their undergraduate education. A previous participant, Adam Letto, said participating in the competition “sets you apart” as a marketing student as it “shows [employers] that ‘Hey, I’ve done things outside of just going to get a degree,’ because a lot people go to get a degree, but it’s about the education that you receive” (Big Eagle Sales Competition). Participating in the sales competition takes what is learned in the classroom and puts it into action in a real-life scenario that mirrors the everyday workforce students can expect as employees. Letto further iterates, “Sales is not simply selling, it’s building relationships. This is something that you do not truly understand until you get to participate in the process for yourself. Without the UWL Sales Competition, I might never have given sales a chance.”

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Latest News

Federal Legislative Update: FY18 Omnibus Spending Bill

On March 21, congressional leaders reached a deal to pass the FY18 omnibus appropriations bill to fund the government through September 30, 2018. The following reflects how the omnibus impacted the 2017 UW System’s Federal Budget and Appropriations priorities:

Effects on Student Aid

  • Maximum Pell Grant award increased $175. The max 2018-2019 award will be $6,095.
  • TRIO and GEAR UP funding increased $60 million and $10.2 million.
  • Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grants funding increased $106.9 million–14% increase to $840 million.
  • Federal Work Study aid funding increased $140 million–14% increase to $1.13 billion.
  • No Perkins Loan extension, which means the program will continue to phase out.

Effects on Research Funding

  • National Institutes of Health funding increased $3 billion–8% increase to $37.1 billion.
  • National Science Foundation funding increased $295 million–4% increase to $7.8 billion.
  • Department of Energy’s Office of Science funding increased $868 million–16% increase to $6.26 billion.
  • USDA’s Ag and Food Research Initiative (AFRI) funding increased $25 million–7% increase to $400 million.

Effects on Other Federal Funding

  • Economic Development Administration funding increased $26 million–9.4% increase to $302 million.
  • Non-Land-Grants funded flat at $5 million.
  • National Endowment for the Humanities funding increased $3 million to $152.85 million.
  • Charter schools funding increased by $58 million to $400 million, including $7.5 million to expand charters in underserved, high-poverty, rural areas.
  • Corporation for Public Broadcasting provided an advance appropriation of $465 million for FY 2020–the same level of advance funding provided in FY 17.
  • National Institute of Standards and Technology funding increased $247 million to $1.2 billion, including $140 million for the Hollings Manufacturing Extension Partnership.

The budget allocations provide a significant contrast to the proposed budget cuts by the Trump administration, which included, again, the proposed closures of the National Endowments of the Humanities and Arts, as well as the Institute of Museum and Library Services, each of which received a budget increase.

Sources: UW System and GRC GrantWeek


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IMLS Offers New Funding for Community Engagement

The Institute of Museum and Library Sciences (IMLS) has opened a new grant-making program that supports projects that engage libraries, archives, and museums (LAMS) with their communities to leverage their unique abilities to affect positive change. The Activating Community Opportunities Using Museums/Libraries as Assets program is part of a special Community Catalyst initiative under the IMLS National Leadership Grant program, which supports projects that address challenges and advance practice in the library and museum fields.

Under this grant program, successful projects will demonstrate how LAMs can provide trusted spaces for, and learn from, ongoing community dialogue to facilitate discovery, mutual understanding, and shared goals among individuals. In addition, successful projects will demonstrate the viability of using and adapting existing approaches gleaned from the collective impact, social well-being, and community development arenas. A range of approaches are currently being employed in these fields that could be helpful as potential applicants consider their proposed projects.

The five areas of interest within this initiative are provided below. A successful project should align with one or more:

  1. Adaptable Models for Joint Efforts to Engage and Serve a Local Community
  2. Broadening Reach into New Communities with Existing and Potential Partners
  3. Community Buy-in and Asset Mapping
  4. Sharing Findings and Project Evaluation
  5. Opportunities to Link with Economic Development Efforts

For additional details about the grant application and process, please review the full solicitation. If you are interested in submitting an application, contact ORSP for submission guidance.

Sources: GRC GrantWeek and IMLS


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Save the Date: WiSys Science & Technology Symposium July 30-31 at UW-Parkside

Mark your calendar! WiSys’s 11th Annual Science & Technology Symposium will be held at UW-Parkside July 30-31. This two-day event is the year’s signature networking opportunity for University of Wisconsin researchers, students, and industry professionals. The symposium will bring together the brightest minds in the Badger state to facilitate collaborations and celebrate innovation across disciplines. Register on the event website.

The WSTS event features the following events:

  • Poster Symposium: Students have the opportunity to share their research with over 200 UW System faculty, administrators, business leaders, and community members. Presenters have chances to win cash prizes and the opportunity to list award-winning research on their resumes. Submit your poster online.
  • Innovation Showcase: Students have the opportunity to showcase innovative, hands-on projects in any academic discipline. Presenters are welcome to demonstrate their project using the following formats: prototype, computer display, application storyboard, etc. Please list any special space requirements on your project submission. WiSys can provide tables and power sources, but student teams will be responsible for providing their own computers, screens, and displays.
  • Networking BanquetThis celebration of innovation will include a banquet dinner, drinks, and opportunities to network with innovators from across the state. An award ceremony will follow to honor the Carl E. Gulbrandsen Innovator of the Year and other impactful work being done in Wisconsin. As always, the cost of the evening networking event is just $15, which includes dinner, refreshments, and special programming. Scholarships from UW System cover the cost of the evening event for all UW students.
  • Faculty Open Mic: If you are interested in sharing your latest research, seeking a collaborator, or using new tools to enhance learning in the classroom, then this session is for you! Each participant will have 5 minutes using 3 slides only! Participants must be registered for WSTS and must be affiliated with a UW System institution. Slides must be submitted no later than Sunday, July 1, to take part. Use this opportunity to spark discussion with other WSTS attendees at the networking break directly following this session. Registration can be found here.

See the event website to register and for information about the full schedule and hotel reservations.

Source: WiSys

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Save the Date: April 5 Grant Writing Webinar

On Thursday, April 5, 2:00-3:15 pm, WiSys Regional Research Administrator Jeremy Miner (UW-Eau Claire) will present the final grant seeking professional development webinar for UW System faculty and staff. The final webinar topic is “Half Points: Making Your Grant Proposal Distinctively Different.” The session will be 75 minutes total, with 60 minutes of presentation and 15 minutes for Q&A. ORSP is hosting the webinar broadcast in the Institute for Campus Excellence (150 Murphy Library).

Contact ORSP with questions about the content of earlier webinars in the series.

WiSys Spring 2018 Grant Webinar Series UW-La Crosse

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Recent Submissions

 


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Recent Awards

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UWL & UW System Grants

UWL Academic Staff Professional Development Grants

Program contact: Matthew Schneider (mschneider@uwlax.edu)

Program summary: Academic Staff Professional Development grants support professional development for UWL academic staff. Such opportunities enable staff to increase their effectiveness by expanding knowledge in their areas of expertise, refining and developing skills, and enhancing staff morale. All academic staff (instructional/non-instructional) with at least a 0.50 FTE academic year appointment are eligible. Examples of eligible activities include professional training and development, participation in a conference or workshop, bringing speakers to campus to provide presentations to academic staff, etc.

Deadline: June 1, 2018 (for proposed activities occurring between July 1 and October 31, 2018)

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UWL Teaching and Learning Grants

Program contact: Center for Advancing Teaching & Learning (CATL)

Program summary: These grants support projects that investigate how students learn and how teaching affects student thinking, learning, and behavior. Applicants for CATL Teaching and Learning Grants must be full-time tenure-track faculty or instructional academic staff during the period of the grant project. There are three types of grants available:

  • Lesson Study Grants: Classroom inquiry in which several instructors jointly design, teach, observe, analyze, and refine a single class lesson in one of their courses. The goal is to better understand how students learn, and to use that information to improve teaching.
  • Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL) Grants: Support classroom research in which instructors investigate teaching and learning in their own classes. Grants fund projects that examine a significant learning issue or problem in one’s field, subject area, or course–e.g., why students have difficulty learning certain concepts or skills, difficulty applying knowledge and skills to new circumstances, achievement gaps among groups of students, and so on. SoTL grants support projects carried out during the academic year.
  • Course-Embedded Undergraduate Research Grants: These grants are designed to help instructors develop novel course-embedded undergraduate research and creative activities.

Deadline: anticipated mid-June 2018

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UWL International Program Development Fund

Program contact: Rose Brougham (rbrougham@uwlax.edu)

Program summary: Through institutional partnerships and other scholarly activities, university faculty and academic staff are connected with other universities and organizations throughout the world. International experiences bring the world to the classroom, enhance research, and assist in preparing students, faculty, and staff in becoming global citizens for the 21st century. The grant program focuses on the development of faculty- and staff-led programs (e.g., scoping visits) or faculty exchanges.

Deadline: May 7, 2018

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UWL International Scholarship Grants

Program contact: Provost Office

Program summary: The program supports internationalization of the university through research and other scholarly projects that are international in scope and have the potential to transform the applicant’s research. One of the primary outcomes associated with this program is the support of travel costs to present research at international venues. However, UWL employees may submit proposals associated with conducting scholarly endeavors abroad and/or enhancing their professional development in a manner that maximizes the interaction between faculty/staff and the host culture/community. Proposals must be approved by the department and dean and demonstrate that the university will realize tangible benefits.

Deadline: May 7, 2018

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UWL Visiting Scholar/Artist of Color Program

Program contact: Provost Office

Program summary: The Visiting Scholar/Artist of Color Program supports bringing four or more scholars/artists of color to campus each year. The purpose of a larger number of shorter visits (rather than semester-long programs) serves to increase the program’s visibility on campus and increase the potential representation of individuals across the university. Members of UWL faculty and academic staff may nominate individuals to visit campus during the academic year. A primary goal is significant interaction with students as well as faculty and staff by the visiting scholar/artist. Travel costs and honoraria may be requested in the grant.

Deadline: July 9, 2018 at 4:00 pm (for fall semester scholars/artists)

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UW System Ideadvance Seed Fund

Program contacts: Anne Hlavacka, UWL Small Business Development Center and UW Ideadvance New Idea Concierge

Program summary: The Ideadvance Seed Fund combines early-stage grant funding with business mentoring to development innovative ideas and potential businesses from UW alumni and current UW faculty, staff, and student entrepreneurs. Ideas originating from all disciplines are encouraged. Stage 1 grants fund up to $25,000 and aim to help applicants reduce the risk in a business idea by determining features that will solve a real customer need. Stage 1 awardees are eligible to apply for Stage 2 grants, which fund up to $50,000 to support development of a business model that effectively delivers solutions to customers and prepares the idea for investment.

Eligible applicants should first consult with the UWL Small Business Development Center (SBDC) and the UW Ideadvance New Idea Concierge to learn about developing a competitive proposal.

Deadline: April 27, 2018

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Grant News, March 2018

Community Connections

It Make$ Cents!

Foundation Spotlight

La Crosse Community Foundation

Latest News

NIJ’s W.E.B. Du Bois Program Targeted to New and Advanced Investigators in Crime, Violence, & Justice

NIH’s Inclusion Across the Lifespan Policy to Take Effect January 2019

Health Workforce Research Center Program Accepting Applications Now!

Save the Dates for Grant Seeking Professional Development Webinars!

Recent Submissions & Awards

UWL & UW System Grants

UWL Academic Staff Professional Development Grants

UWL Curricular Redesign Grants

UWL Carol Dobrunz Endowment Fund

UWL International Program Development Fund

UWL International Scholarship Grant

UWL Visiting Scholar/Artist of Color Program

UW System Ideadvance Seed Fund

External Grants

Most grants listed below require the institutional GRC log-in to access. If you need the GRC log-in, please see the newsletter in your UWL inbox or contact ORSP.

Local/Regional Grants

Arts Midwest
US Bank Foundation
Community Possible Grants-Apr 30, 2018 (Work grants–workforce education & economic prosperity)
Wisconsin Humanities Council

Arts / Humanities / International

Association for the Sociology of Religion
Consulate General of Sweden
Council on Foreign Relations
French American Cultural Exchange Foundation
Japan Society for the Promotion of Science
Music Teachers National Association (MTNA) Foundation
National Endowment for the Humanities
Netherlands Institute for Advanced Study in the Humanities and Social Sciences
Russell Sage Foundation (social sciences research)
Education/Economic and Community Development
Dollar General Literacy Foundation
Economic History Association
Ethics and Excellence in Journalism Foundation
Grant (William T.) Foundation (understanding how children & youth develop and thrive)
IBM Center for The Business of Government
Kresge Foundation (Broad funding opportunities in arts and culture, education, environment, health, and human services)
Retirement Research Foundation
Society for the Psychological Study of Social Issues
Spencer Foundation (multidisciplinary education research)
State Justice Institute
US Department of Justice

Health

Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ)
Alternatives Research & Development Foundation (reducing animal use)
American Diabetes Association
Burroughs Wellcome Fund
Christopher and Dana Reeve Foundation (improve opportunities and quality of life for individuals living with disabilities (primarily paralysis) and their families)
Quality of Life Grants – Apr 11, 2018 (LOI for Direct Effect Tier)
National Institutes of Health (NIH)
National Institutes of Justice
Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (Building a Culture of Health)

Science/Technology/Engineering/Math

Association for Women in Mathematics
Dreyfus Foundation (chemical sciences)
National Research Council (STEM and behavioral sciences research)
National Science Foundation (NSF)
Research Corporation for Science Advancement (for early career tenure-track assistant professors in astronomy, chemistry, and physics)
US Department of Commerce
US Department of Justice
W. M. Keck Foundation
Wenner-Gren Foundation for Anthropological Research


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Community Connections: It Make$ Cents!

Increasing community engagement is one of the pillars of UWL’s strategic plan, outlined as a “key component to our teaching, scholarly, & service mission.” In the Office of Research and Sponsored Programs, we have the amazing opportunity to work with dedicated faculty and staff as they develop, plan, and write grants that will help them serve our community. In this month’s newsletter, we would like not only to congratulate Louise Janke (Director of Financial Aid) and Amanda Gasper (Financial Literacy Coordinator) for receiving the Governor’s Financial Literacy Award for the UWL It Make$ Cents! program, but also to draw attention to the transformative work they are doing on campus and in the community.

Financial literacy is not necessarily a topic that students know or understand when entering college. With many outside factors such as income, tuition, student loans, and rent to consider when planning personal finances, Gasper says now more than ever “many individuals are in need of financial information, education, and access to resources to assist with their economic challenges and struggles.” Social media sources like Facebook and Pinterest, as well as a general Google search, can provide a great deal information, but where should students or parents start? What resources are available on campus and in the community to students who wish to become savvy savers or student loan literate? That’s where the It Make$ Cents! crew can help. Staffed with a Financial Literacy Coordinator (Gasper), a graduate assistant, and several student peer mentors, the It Make$ Cents! team strives to provide “appropriate knowledge, skills, and resources conveyed through financial education and literacy programming,” which “gives students proper support to overcome some of the financial challenges they will face.”

The broader impacts of It Make$ Cents! are made possible not only by the dedication of Janke, Gasper, and the peer mentors who engage students on a daily basis, but also through the successful funding of a grant supported by the Otto Bremer Trust. Otto Bremer supports grants that make a meaningful impact on those living in the Upper Midwest. The success of this grant has allowed the program to “extensively market events and build awareness/visibility on campus and within the community,” as well as to develop partnerships with community organizations such as the UW Credit Union, Consumer Credit Counseling Service, Three Sixty Real Estate Solutions, and others. These collaborations have provided the It Make$ Cents! team opportunities to create workshops and activities not only educational for high school and college students, parents, and the general public, but also fun. Examples of activities provided include scavenger hunts, geocache contests, game nights, financial bingo, money monologues, movie nights, and financial education sessions. Gasper says the grant not only “offered us the opportunity to develop a strong marketing initiative,” but also “a community presence, and a solid foundation to enhance, grow and extend our current programming to the local high schools and college students.” Furthermore, students who work as peer mentors are given hands-on experiences that prepare them to understand and educate others on finances and financial literacy, which are topics that will be beneficial to them in their chosen careers after graduation.

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Foundation Spotlight: La Crosse Community Foundation 

Established in 1930, the La Crosse Community Foundation (LCF) is a public charity created by and for the people of La Crosse. The purpose of the foundation is to “enrich the quality of life in the greater La Crosse area” through the administration of charitable donations, traditionally in the form of endowment funds, that will make a return investment to the community by funding grants that support needed services and programs.

LCF funds grants in seven areas: Arts & Humanities, Community Improvement, Recreation & Wellness, Culture & Diversity, Education & Scholarships, Environment, and Health & Human Services. Through these seven areas, LCF funds grants under six grant opportunities:

  1. General Fund: The General Fund is the most common source for LCF grant funding, as well as the largest source of competitive funds. This funding is very flexible in what it supports, as it is designed to respond to changing community needs. There are two levels of funding: Standard Grant ($7,500 and up) and Mini-Grant ($7,500 or less). Organizations may apply for a General Fund Standard Grant (more than $7,500) up to two times in any rolling 12-month period, with the option for a second application only if the first request is denied. The second application must also be for a different need. General Fund Mini-Grant applications (for requests of $7,500 or less) may be submitted every funding cycle for a different need, but applying every cycle is not recommended.
  2. Robert and Eleanor Franke Charitable Fund: As of June 30, 2018, the Robert and Eleanor Franke Charitable Foundation will dissolve, and 1/3 of its assets will go to LCF. Under LCF, the Charitable Fund will continue to support “government, charitable, humane, educational, medical and scientific achievement within the doctrines of the Catholic Church.”
  3. Global Awareness Fund: Supports projects that expand the community’s awareness of the multicultural world by helping individuals identify with people from outside the US.
  4. Mary Grace Sieber Fund: Supports projects that assist young people who have physical, emotional, or mental disabilities so they can participate in programs to enhance their ability to lead more independent and full lives.
  5. Corinne Zielke Fund: Supports baseball programs in the La Crosse area.
  6. June Kjome Justice & Peace Fund: Supports educational efforts in the La Crosse area that address the root causes of injustice and promote peace.

Deadlines

For funds that have not yet specified a deadline, contact Jamie Schloegel (LCF Program Director) to inquire about upcoming deadlines.

  1. General Fund: April 15, 2018 and July 15, 2018
  2. Robert & Elanor Franke Charitable Fund: This fund will begin taking requests July 1, 2018. See LCF website for more details.
  3. Global Awareness Fund: Not specified. Check with LCF to see when applications will be accepted.
  4. Mary Grace Sieber Fund: In 2018, this fund will accepts applications received via invite only.
  5. Corinne Zielke Fund: Accepts applications between December 15-January 15 each year.
  6. June Kjome Justice & Peace Fund: Not specified. Check with LCF to see when applications will be accepted.

Best Practice

It is strongly recommended that prospective applicants contact LCF to discuss project ideas prior to submitting an application. Refer to the following ORSP resources to provide a framework for the discussion:

Contact

Jamie Schloegel, Program Director, jamie@laxcommfoundation.com, phone: 608-782-3223 (ext. 23)

Website: La Crosse Community Foundation

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Latest News

NIJ’s W.E.B. Du Bois Program Targeted to New and Advanced Investigators in Crime, Violence, & Justice

The National Institute of Justice’s W.E.B. Du Bois Program places emphasis on crime, violence, and the administration of justice in diverse cultural contexts within the US. The program supports quantitative and qualitative research from all social, behavioral, and other disciplines that furthers the Department’s mission by advancing knowledge regarding the intersections of race, crime, violence, and the administration of justice within the US. This solicitation seeks investigator-initiated proposals for funding to conduct research on topics linked to issues deemed critical by the US Department of Justice, including:

  • Reducing violent crime
  • Enhancing investigations and prosecution;
  • Protecting police officers and other public safety personnel;
  • Reducing victimization; and
  • Enhancing immigration enforcement.

NIJ seeks applications for funding from two categories of researchers:

1. W.E.B. Du Bois Scholars in Race and Crime Research: Researchers who are advanced in their careers (awarded a terminal degree at least six years prior to December 31, 2018) may apply for 36-month (or less) grants, with funding up to $500,000 for research and mentoring less-experienced researchers.

2. W.E.B. Du Bois Fellowship for Research on Race and Crime: Researchers who are early in their careers (awarded a terminal degree within six years prior to December 31, 2018) may apply for 24-month (or less) grants, with funding up to $250,000 for research. A period of residency at NIJ is optional, but not required.

Deadline: April 30, 2018

Source: National Institute of Justice (NIJ)


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NIH’s Inclusion Across the Lifespan Policy to Take Effect January 2019

If you are planning to submit a NIH application on or after January 25, 2019, that involves a human participants study, then you will need to plan on describing how participants across the lifespan will be included in your research.  Here’s why you should begin planning for this change:

In December 2017, NIH posted a revision to the decades-old policy on the Inclusion of Children in Clinical Research. Previously, the policy stated that children should be included in all human subjects’ research, unless there was a scientific or ethical reason not to include them. After consideration and review of responses from research experts and the public, NIH will now require you to justify how the proposed age range of participants fits the Specific Aims of the project, as well as justify why your research excludes other populations (e.g., older adults). A common concern noted by survey participants included “concerns that many trials include poorly justified age-based exclusions…and that older adults, who carry a disproportionate burden of disease, are often underrepresented in clinical trials.” The link above provides guidelines and examples of situations where exclusion of individuals based on age may be appropriate.

Source: NIH Extramural Nexus


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Health Workforce Research Center Program Accepting Applications Now

The Health Resources & Services Administration (HRSA) is now accepting applications for the Health Workforce Research Center Cooperative Agreement Program. The program aims to 1) collect, analyze, and report health workforce program data to the National Center for Health Workforce Analysis and to the public; and 2) offer technical assistance to local and regional entities on the collection, analysis, and reporting of health workforce data. The four-year agreement will enable two awardees to focus on health equity in health workforce education/training ($450,000) and the behavioral health workforce ($900,000). HRSA will partner with the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) to support the award on the behavioral health track. The submission deadline is April 12, 2018.

Source: GRC GrantWeek


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Save the Dates for Grant Seeking Professional Development Webinars!

In spring 2018, WiSys Regional Research Administrator Jeremy Miner (UW-Eau Claire) is hosting a series of professional development webinars for UW System faculty and staff. Topics will span the continuum of grant seeking expertise, addressing the needs of novice as well as seasoned grant applicants. Sessions are each targeted to be 75 minutes total, with 60 minutes of presentation and 15 minutes for Q&A.

Dates and topics are provided below. The webinars will be hosted by ORSP in the Institute for Campus Excellence (150 Murphy Library).

WiSys Spring 2018 Grant Webinar Series UW-La Crosse

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Recent Submissions

 


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Recent Awards

 

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UWL & UW System Grants

UWL Academic Staff Professional Development Grants

Program contact: Matthew Schneider (mschneider@uwlax.edu)

Program summary: Academic Staff Professional Grants support professional development opportunities for academic staff (at least 0.50 FTE academic year) that will enhance their effectiveness in meeting changing needs and roles in higher education. The program funds projects that involve professional training or development or participation in a conference/workshop.

Deadline: June 1, 2018

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UWL Curricular Redesign Grants

Program contact: UWL Center for Advancing Teaching & Learning (CATL)

Program summary: Curricular Redesign Grants support groups of instructors to develop or redesign and implement curricula and teaching practices in academic programs. The program funds projects that involve significant revisions intended to address challenging learning goals, student learning problems, and/or achievement gaps. Priority will be given to projects that go above and beyond normal curriculum development, course updates, and minor revisions. Projects should include design, assessment, and further improvement of curriculum and teaching practices.

Deadline: March 5, 2018

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UWL Carol Dobrunz Endowment Fund

Program contact: Faculty Senate IAS Committee Chair (see the current Faculty Senate Committee Assignments)

Program summary: This fund supports conference costs for non-tenured faculty or instructional academic staff (IAS) without an indefinite appointment. The recipient must meet the following criteria: 1) must be employed at UWL with at least a 75 percent appointment; 2) must be either a non-tenured faculty member or a member of instructional academic staff without an indefinite appointment; 3) must be attending a national conference within their discipline; 4) may not have previously received this award.

Note: There have been changes to the application process for the spring 2018 submission deadline. However, eligible applicants and activities remain the same. See the program webpage for the updated guidelines.

Deadline: March 30, 2018

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UWL International Program Development Fund

Program contact: Rose Brougham (rbrougham@uwlax.edu)

Program summary: The grant program focuses on the development of faculty- and staff-led programs (e.g., scoping visits) or faculty exchanges.

Deadline: May 7, 2018


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UWL International Scholarship Grant

Program contact: Provost Office

Program summary: The program supports internationalization of the university through research and other scholarly projects that are international in scope and have the potential to transform the applicant’s research. One of the primary outcomes associated with this program is the support of travel costs to present research at international venues. However, UWL employees may submit proposals associated with conducting scholarly endeavors abroad and/or enhancing their professional development in a manner that maximizes the interaction between faculty/staff and the host culture/community. Proposals must be approved by the department and dean and demonstrate that the university will realize tangible benefits.

Deadline: May 7, 2018


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UWL Visiting Scholar/Artist of Color Program

Program contact: Provost Office

Program summary: As part of UWL’s vision that diversity is central to providing and retaining a quality learning environment and sense of world community at the University, these grants support the travel costs and honoraria of a  scholar/artist of color to  visit the campus during the academic year. The purpose of a larger number of shorter visits (rather than semester-long programs) serves to increase the program’s visibility on campus and increase the potential representation of individuals across the university.

Deadline: July 9, 2018

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UW System Ideadvance Seed Fund

Program contacts: Anne Hlavacka, UWL Small Business Development Center and UW Ideadvance New Idea Concierge

Program summary: The Ideadvance Seed Fund combines early-stage grant funding with business mentoring to development innovative ideas and potential businesses from UW alumni and current UW faculty, staff, and student entrepreneurs. Ideas originating from all disciplines are encouraged. Stage 1 grants fund up to $25,000 and aim to help applicants reduce the risk in a business idea by determining features that will solve a real customer need. Stage 1 awardees are eligible to apply for Stage 2 grants, which fund up to $50,000 to support development of a business model that effectively delivers solutions to customers and prepares the idea for investment.

Eligible applicants should first consult with the UWL Small Business Development Center (SBDC) and the UW Ideadvance New Idea Concierge to learn about developing a competitive proposal.

Deadline: April 27, 2018

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Grant News, February 2018

Latest News

Changes Made to UWL Carol Dobrunz Endowment Fund Application Process

Save the Dates for Grant Seeking Professional Development Webinars!

Department of Education Publishes Upcoming Grants

NSF Hosts S-STEM Webinars for FY18 Submissions

EPA Seeks Local Partners to Enhance Environmental Education

NSF 2018 Proposal Guidelines Changes in Effect on January 29, 2018

Overview of UWL Awards for 2nd Quarter, FY 2018

Recent Submissions & Awards

UWL & UW System Grants

UWL Margins of Excellence Fund

UWL Curricular Redesign Grants

UWL Carol Dobrunz Endowment Fund

UWL Program Assessment Grant

UW System Ideadvance Seed Feed

External Grants

Most grants listed below require the institutional GRC log-in to access. If you need the GRC log-in, please see the newsletter in your UWL inbox or contact ORSP.

Local/Regional Grants

Arts Midwest
La Crosse Community Foundation
La Crosse Public Education Foundation
US Bank Foundation
Wisconsin Humanities Council
Wisconsin Space Grant Consortium

Arts / Humanities / International

American Historical Association
American Library Association
Diversity Research Grants-Apr 15, 2018 (addressing gaps in knowledge of diversity issues in library & information science)
Dirksen Congressional Center
Henry Luce Foundation
National Endowment for the Arts (NEA)
Challenge America-Apr 12, 2018 (professional arts programming and projects emphasizing the potential of arts in community development)
National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH)
Samuel H. Kress Foundation (Interpretation, preservation, study, and teaching of European art from antiquity to early 19th century)

Kress Grants-Apr 1, 2018

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Education/Economic and Community Development
American Political Science Association
Hispanic Scholarship Fund
Project Management Institute

Health

American Cancer Society

Research, Training, and Professorship-Apr 1, 2018

American Psychological Foundation

Fellowships, Research, and Program Grants-Apr 1, 2018 (Multiple deadlines)

Elsa U. Pardee Foundation

Cancer Research Grants-Apr 30, 2018

National Institutes of Health (NIH)

Cancer Biology Research-Multiple opportunities & deadlines
Conference Grants to Advance Collaborative Research on Aging Biology (R13)-Apr 12, 2018
Division of Cardiovascular Sciences-Multiple opportunities & deadlines
NIH Support for Conferences and Scientific Meetings (R13)-April 12, 2018
Platform Delivery Technologies for Nucleic Acid Therapeutics (R41/$42)-Apr 5, 2018

National Multiple Sclerosis Society

MS Funding Opportunities-Apr 9, 2018

Society for the Psychological Study of Social Issues (SPSSI members only; multiple opportunities)

Applied Social Issues Internship Program-Apr 15, 2018 (Undergrads/grads eligible)

Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA)

Drug Free Communities Support Program-Mar 29, 2018 

US Department of Health and Human Services

Indian Health Service Scholarship Program-Mar 28, 2018

Research on Research Integrity-Mar 23, 2018

US Food and Drug Administration

Enhancing Regulatory Science for the Risk Based Assessment of Emerging Manufacturing-Mar 30, 2018

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Science/Technology/Engineering/Math

American Astronomical Society

Chrétien International Research Grants – Apr 1, 2018

Civilian Research and Development Foundation Global

Cooperative Grants Program-Multiple deadlines (cooperative research for scientists & engineers to address critical societal needs)

Human Frontier Science Program

Research Grants, Fellowships and Awards-Mar 19, 2018 (interdisciplinary, international research on complex mechanisms of living organisms)

National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)

Research Opportunities in Space & Earth Sciences (ROSES)-Multiple deadlines (over 50 programs released monthly supporting all aspects of basic & applied research & technology in space and earth sciences)

National Science Foundation (NSF)

NSF INCLUDES-Apr 4, 2018 (increasing participation and enhancing preparation of underrepresented, underserved individuals in STEM)
NSF-CBMS Regional Research Conferences in the Mathematical Sciences- Apr 27, 2018
Expeditions in Computing-Apr 25, 2018
Communications, Circuits, and Sensing-Systems-Apr 2, 2018
Electronics, Photonics, and Magnetic Devices-Apr 2, 2018
Industry/University Cooperative Research Centers Program-Apr 18, 2018

Smithsonian Institution (undergrad/grad internships; grad/senior fellowships)

Smithsonian Opportunities for Research and Study-Multiple deadlines

US Department of Agriculture

Organic Agriculture Research and Extension Initiative-Mar 29, 2018 (biological, physical, and social sciences, including economics)
Organic Transitions Program-Mar 29, 2018
Sustainable Agriculture Research and Education Program-Apr 2018 (Additional multiple deadlines)

US Department of Commerce

Sea Grant Marine Aquaculture Grant Program-Mar 2, 2018

US Department of Defense

Consortium Research Fellows Program (students & faculty eligible)-Applications accepted anytime

DARPA: Biological Technologies Office-Apr 26, 2018

Environmental Security Technology Certification Program-Mar 8, 2018

US Department of Energy

Joint Genome Institute-Mar 1, 2018

US Department of the Interior

Wildlife Without Borders: Species, Regional, & Global Programs-Apr 1, 2018

US Department of Transportation

Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR)-Mar 20, 2018
Transit Cooperative Research Program-Multiple opportunities & deadlines

Whitehall Foundation (basic research in vertebrate and invertebrate neurobiology)

Grants-in-Aid and Research Grants-Apr 15, 2018

Wisconsin Space Grant Consortium
Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (Undergrad/grad grants in multiple STEM fields)

Education Programs-Multiple opportunities & deadlines

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Latest News

Changes Made to UWL Carol Dobrunz Endowment Fund Application Process

Effective for the upcoming March 30, 2018, submission deadline, the application process for the UWL Carol Dobrunz Endowment Fund has undergone several changes. Despite changes to the process, the program’s purpose and eligibility criteria remain the same. Changes include the following:

  • Application materials should now be entered into Digital Measures (DM). Then the applicant must generate a Grant Proposal Report in DM. The Grant Proposal Report serves as the application that is to be submitted by the applicant for review. This mirrors the application process for the majority of other UWL internal grants.
  • Applications (DM Grant Proposal Reports) should be submitted via email to senate@uwlax.edu prior to the deadline.
  • The Faculty Senate Instructional Academic Staff (IAS) Committee will now serve as the grant program review panel.

The grant guidelines have been updated with instructions for the new application process, and a tutorial video on the program webpage provides step-by-step instructions and recommendations on entering information into DM and generating a DM Grant Proposal Report.

The UWL Carol Dobrunz Endowment Fund supports conference costs for eligible non-tenured faculty or IAS with a continuing appointment. The award may be used for conference related travel costs. To be eligible, the conference must occur between July 1 and June 30 of the upcoming year. Applications are due the last Friday in March (March 30, 2018).

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Save the Dates for Grant Seeking Professional Development Webinars!

In spring 2018, WiSys Regional Research Administrator Jeremy Miner (UW-Eau Claire) will be hosting five professional development webinars for UW System faculty and staff. Topics will span the continuum of grant seeking expertise, addressing the needs of novice as well as seasoned grant applicants. Sessions are each targeted to be 75 minutes total, with 60 minutes of presentation and 15 minutes for Q&A.

Dates and topics are provided below. The webinars will be hosted by ORSP in the Institute for Campus Excellence (150 Murphy Library).

WiSys Spring 2018 Grant Webinar Series UW-La Crosse

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Department of Education Publishes Upcoming Grants

The Department of Education’s Office of Innovation and Improvement (OII) posted upcoming grant opportunities for the 2018 year. Several offices fall under the OII, including Institute of Education Sciences; Office of Elementary and Secondary Education; Office of Postsecondary Education; Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services; Office of Career, Technical, & Adult Education; and Office of English Language Acquisition.

Anticipated grants to be rolled out in the next few months include Promise Neighborhoods Implementation Grants, Teacher Quality Partnership, Charter Schools Program, Arts in Education (Model Development & Dissemination and the National Program), Education and Innovation Research Program, and Supporting Effective Educator Development. The OII website provides continuing updates to RFPs, upcoming deadlines, anticipated award size and number of awards, and contact information for each grant opportunity.

Source: GRC GrantWeek


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NSF Hosts S-STEM Webinars for FY18 Submissions

The National Science Foundation (NSF) will be hosting upcoming webinars in February for the upcoming Scholarships in Science, Technology, Engineering, & Mathematics (S-STEM) program submission deadline. S-STEM applications are due March 28, 2018. The first half-hour of the webinar will consist of an overview of the program itself; this will be followed by a question-and-answer session. It will be helpful to review the solicitation before the webinars. Upcoming webinar dates and access information is provided below. Full webinar information and content is archived at the S-STEM webinar website.

Webinar 1
When: 2:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. Central Time, Tuesday, 6 February
URL: http://bit.ly/2rAmxKS
Meeting number (access code): 745 404 200.
Meeting password: vMt7aGF$
Host: Tom Kim (chemistry, tkim@nsf.gov)

Webinar 2
When: 11:00 am to 1:00 p.m. Central Time, Thursday, 15 February
URL: http://bit.ly/2E45aVo
Meeting number (access code): 742 904 512.
Meeting password: uVCjCm?2
Host: Ron Buckmire (mathematics, rbuckmir@nsf.gov)

Source: NSF


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EPA Seeks Local Partners to Enhance Environmental Education

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is soliciting applications for the 2018 Environmental Education (EE) Local Grant Program. Approximately $3 million will be spread out between EPA’s 10 regions to promote environmental and conservation literacy and encourage behavior that will benefit the environment in local communities. Each region is expected to award three to four grants this cycle, meaning applicants willonly be competing against other local entities for multiple chances at funding. EPA does require cost sharing, and exactly 25 percent of the total award amount must go to subgrantees.

Applications are due by March 15, 2018.

A webinar will be hosted on February 21, 2018. Slides about the EE program, and archived information from a previous webinar, can be found here.

Source: GRC GrantWeek


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NSF 2018 Proposal Guidelines Changes in Effect January 29, 2018

The National Science Foundation (NSF) has finalized the changes to the 2018 Proposal & Award Policies & Procedures Guide (PAPPG). These changes have gone into effect for all NSF applications submitted on or after January 29, 2018. The significant changes are summarized as follows and can be reviewed more in-depth in the January Grant News:

  • Eligibility Standards: Eligibility standards have been revised for international branch campuses of institutions of higher education
  • Project Description must include an “Intellectual Merit” section
  • Budget Justification has increased from 3 to 5 pages
  • Clarifying language added to the PAPPG in relation to the required “Results from Prior NSF Support” section of the Project Description
  • New Language about Life Sciences Dual Use Research of Concern (DURC)

Additional updates and clarifications can be found in NSF’s PAPPG under “Significant Changes and Clarifications to the PAPPG.”

Source: NSF


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Overview of UWL Awards for 2nd Quarter, FY 2018

FY18 Q2 Awards by College Division

FY18 Q2 Awards by Source

FY18 Q2 Major Funding Sources

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Recent Submissions

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Recent Awards

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UWL & UW System Grants

UWL Margins of Excellence Fund

Program contact: UWL Provost Office

Summary: The Provost’s Office is requesting proposals associated with enhancing experiential learning opportunities for UWL students. The intent of the Margins of Excellence Fund is to provide funds to heighten visibility and understanding of the importance of experiential learning as a high-impact practice both within UWL and externally to the greater community. It is not intended that this fund will supplant University resources that support these types of programs. It is desirable that the use of these funds serve as a catalyst for 1) increasing the number of students having the interest and opportunity to participate in experiential learning opportunities, 2) more faculty wanting to incorporate experiential learning into their curriculum, 3) providing compelling reasons for donors (alumni, friends, and others) to invest in this Margins of Educational Excellence, 4) taking advantage of donation challenges where possible, and 5) for the general public to understand and appreciate this important contribution of UWL to the economy and education of its citizenry (The Wisconsin Idea).

Eligibility: Eligibility is limited to recognized UWL programs, units, or organizations. Individual faculty or staff members are encouraged to work through a recognized unit with ideas that have a wide impact. Preference will be given to proposals that 1) effectively indicate a wide impact on or for UWL, 2) provide robust ideas for the assessment of outcomes, and 3) clearly articulate a sound plan for a continuity of the project without Margins of Excellence funding (if applicable).

Allowable costs: Funds shall be used to support a variety of experiential learning opportunities across campus.  Programs that provide direct student support should prepare them or enhance current or future educational experiences, as opposed to awarding them for past accomplishments.  Possible uses of the Fund may include, but are not limited, to the following:

  • Student stipends and support for undergraduate and graduate student research, creative activities, student teaching/clinical experiences in the School of Education, clinical experiences, especially in the allied health fields  internships, especially those that are unpaid, study away/abroad experiences, student leadership. experiences, and/or community service experiences
  • Facilitation of programs being developed and administered by the Office of Undergraduate Research.
  • Development and/or enhancement of specific programs between a campus unit and external partner such as a business, governmental or non-governmental agency, etc. Some possibilities might include leveraging the funds with these entities.
  • Development workshops for faculty to learn how to become involved with experiential learning. This might include workshops for faculty to share their experiences with colleagues.
  • Recognition/celebratory event(s) for participants—student participants, faculty mentors, community partners, and the general public. This could include receptions, lunches, dinners, etc., and could include research and other scholarly exhibitions.
  • Marketing of programs on campus and beyond (e.g., to students, faculty members, community partners, possible donors).

Proposal Format: Proposals should include the required documents below:

  • Cover sheet with abstract: Indicate the unit(s)/program(s)/organization(s), primary contact(s), timeline for project, and 300-word abstract of project. Indicate if the proposal is for a Small Grant ($4,000 or less) or a Substantive Grant (over $4,000).
  • Narrative: Not to exceed 3 double-spaced pages. The narrative must include a plan for assessment of the program’s effectiveness.
  • Budget sheet: Not to exceed 1 page, including narrative and budget breakdown.

Deadline: February 16, 2018 by 5:00 pm to provost@uwlax.edu

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UWL Curricular Redesign Grants

Program contact: UWL Center for Advancing Teaching & Learning (CATL)

Program summary: Curricular Redesign Grants support groups of instructors to develop or redesign and implement curricula and teaching practices in academic programs. The program funds projects that involve significant revisions intended to address challenging learning goals, student learning problems, and/or achievement gaps. Priority will be given to projects that go above and beyond normal curriculum development, course updates, and minor revisions. Projects should include design, assessment, and further improvement of curriculum and teaching practices.

Deadline: March 5, 2018

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UWL Carol Dobrunz Endowment Fund

Program contact: UWL Faculty Senate IAS Committee Chair (see the current Faculty Senate Committee Assignments)

Program summary: This fund supports conference costs for non-tenured faculty or instructional academic staff (IAS) without an indefinite appointment. The recipient must meet the following criteria: 1) must be employed at UWL with at least a 75 percent appointment; 2) must be either a non-tenured faculty member or a member of instructional academic staff without an indefinite appointment; 3) must be attending a national conference within their discipline; 4) may not have previously received this award.

Note: There have been changes to the application process for the spring 2018 submission deadline. However, eligible applicants and activities remain the same. See the program webpage for the updated guidelines.

Deadline: March 30, 2018

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UWL Program Assessment Grant

Program contact: UWL Provost Office

Program summary: In an effort to support program assessment activities, this grant provides support for gathering, analyzing, discussing, and acting on evidence of student learning in programs. This program is intended to support evidence-informed improvement of teaching and learning in majors and concentrations. Awards may be used for expenses related to the development of assessment plans, collection of assessment data, or the review of assessment data and development of action steps based on results. No single course assessment proposals are eligible. The awards are for projects that will take place in the spring 2018 semester and be completed by June 1, 2018.

Deadline: February 16, 2018

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UW System Ideadvance Seed Fund

Program contacts: Anne Hlavacka, UWL Small Business Development Center and UW Ideadvance New Idea Concierge

Program summary: The Ideadvance Seed Fund combines early-stage grant funding with business mentoring to development innovative ideas and potential businesses from UW alumni and current UW faculty, staff, and student entrepreneurs. Ideas originating from all disciplines are encouraged. Stage 1 grants fund up to $25,000 and aim to help applicants reduce the risk in a business idea by determining features that will solve a real customer need. Stage 1 awardees are eligible to apply for Stage 2 grants, which fund up to $50,000 to support development of a business model that effectively delivers solutions to customers and prepares the idea for investment.

Eligible applicants should first consult with the UWL Small Business Development Center (SBDC) and the UW Ideadvance New Idea Concierge to learn about developing a competitive proposal.

Deadline: April 27, 2018

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Grant News, January 2018

Latest News

Workspace: The New Federal Grant Submission System

NIH ASSIST: The New System for NIH Grant Submission

NSF 2018 Proposal Guidelines: Summary of Significant Changes

NSF Proposal Submission in Research.gov to Begin in April

New Year, New Forms: Revised UWL Grant/Contract Transmittal and Post Award Modifications Forms

Save the Dates for Grant Seeking Professional Development Webinars!

Recent Submissions & Awards

UWL & UW System Grants

UWL Curricular Redesign Grants

UWL Carol Dobrunz Endowment Fund

UWL International Program Development Fund

UWL International Scholarship Grant

UWL Program Assessment Grant

External Grants

Most grants listed below require the institutional GRC log-in to access. If you need the GRC log-in, please see the newsletter in your UWL inbox or contact ORSP.

Local/Regional Grants

Arts Midwest
La Crosse Community Foundation
La Crosse Public Education Foundation
US Bank Foundation
Wisconsin Arts Board
Wisconsin Humanities Council

Arts / Humanities / International

American Philosophical Society
College Art Association
Early American Industries Association (Historic trades, tools, and crafts)
Eisenhower Foundation (Eisenhower presidential library)
Folger Shakespeare Library
Gerald R. Ford Library and Museum (US policies, foreign affairs, and politics)
Hagley Museum and Library
J.M. Kaplan Fund
National Endowment for the Arts (NEA)
Art Works-Feb 15, 2018 (Creation of, public engagement with, lifelong learning in, and community development through the arts)
National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH)
National Gallery of Art
National Trust for Historic Preservation
Tinker Foundation
Institutional Grants-Mar 1, 2018 (Research in democratic governance, education, & sustainable resource management)
Education/Economic and Community Development

Health

American Psychological Foundation
Klingenstein (Esther A. & Joseph) Fund, Inc.
National Institutes of Health (NIH)
US Department of Defense (DOD)

Science/Technology/Engineering/Math

Henry Luce Foundation
Huyck (Edmund Niles) Preserve and Biological Research Station
National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)
National Science Foundation (NSF)
Sigma Xi, The Scientific Research Society (any field of science & engineering)
US Department of Commerce (DOC)
US Department of Defense (DOD) (support for multiple STEM fields, e.g., mechanical sciences, mathematics, electronics, computing science, physics, chemistry, life sciences, materials science, network science, and environmental sciences)
United Negro College Fund (UNCF)

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Latest News

Workspace: The New Federal Grant Submission System

Effective December 31, 2017, the familiar Grants.gov Legacy application package (a.k.a. the SF424 PDF forms) used for federal grant submissions has been retired. In its place is a cloud-based submission system titled Workspace. For UWL’s purposes, Workspace will be used to submit all federal applications except those for the following agencies:

  • NSF: UWL will continue to use FastLane for application submission, although the agency will be transitioning its submissions to Research.gov beginning in April 2018. Users’ credentials are the same for both systems.
  • NIH: UWL will continue to use ASSIST for application submission. ASSIST can be accessed via users’ existing eRA Commons accounts.
  • NASA: UWL will continue to use NSPIRES.

Those who are planning to submit an upcoming federal application to any other federal agency are encouraged to begin the Workspace set-up process early.

How do I get started?

Contact ORSP to request a Grants.gov user account. Once it is set up, ORSP will forward you the user credentials. You will need an individual account before a Workspace can be initiated for a particular grant application.

How do I initiate a Workspace for a new application?

Once you have a Grants.gov user account, you can initiate a Workspace by either:

  • Creating the Workspace via the program posting on Grants.gov (see the video below) or
  • Contacting ORSP with the program information (in particular the Opportunity Number) to request assistance in setting up a Workspace

Once a Workspace is set up, you can begin to complete the application materials. Multiple users can be added to any Workspace, and so you can also have your collaborators added as participants to enable them to complete and review application components. In order to be added as Workspace participants, individuals must have a Grants.gov user account.

Note that a new Workspace must be initiated for each application.

The Workspace for my application is set up. Now what?

All participants assigned to a specific Workspace can complete forms required for the application (unless a form is locked for editing by another user). Forms can be completed by either filling in an online form or uploading a completed PDF version of a form.

ORSP is not automatically notified when you create a new Workspace. So, you are strongly encouraged to contact the office as soon as you set up a Workspace so that we can assist with the process, including adding ORSP staff as participants to enable the review and submission of the application.

Once an application is complete, the materials can be validated within Workspace to check for compliance with Grants.gov requirements. After validation, select the “Complete and Notify AOR” button, which will signal ORSP that the application is ready for final review and submission.

A step-by-step process and checklist resource for using Workspace can be found here on Grants.gov. Please contact ORSP with any questions.

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NIH ASSIST: The New System for NIH Grant Submission

NIH has moved away from using the Grants.gov Legacy application package (a.k.a. the SF424 PDF forms) for federal grant submissions to using the Application Submission System & Interface for Submission Tracking (ASSIST) system. This system is used to prepare and submit grant applications electronically to NIH and other Public Health Service (PHS) agencies.

If you anticipate submitting an NIH grant, the agency has recently published a new Preparing Your Application Using ASSIST page. It provides a step-by-step process for developing both single and multi-project applications, and links to a YouTube video on how to navigate the ASSIST system. You will need an active eRA Commons account to access and submit an application via ASSIST.

ASSIST
ASSIST can be accessed via your existing eRA Commons account (see the highlighted link).

Please contact ORSP to request the initiation of an application in ASSIST.

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NSF 2018 Proposal Guidelines: Summary of Significant Changes

The National Science Foundation (NSF) has finalized the changes to the 2018 Proposal & Award Policies & Procedures Guide (PAPPG). These changes will go into effect for all NSF applications submitted on or after January 29, 2018. The significant changes are summarized as follows:

  • Eligibility Standards: Eligibility standards have been revised for international branch campuses of IHEs. The 2018 guidelines state, “If the proposal includes funding to be provided to an international branch campus of a US institution of higher education (including through use of subawards and consultant arrangements), the proposer must explain the benefit(s) to the project of performance at the international branch campus, and justify why the project activities cannot be performed at the US campus.” See the Nov/Dec NSF Proposal & Award Policy Newsletter for the criteria that NSF wants to see addressed.
  • Project Description: This document must now contain a separate section header identified as “Intellectual Merit.”
  • Budget Justification: This document’s page limit has increased from 3 to 5 pages. The 5-page limit applies separately to both the lead institution and each subaward budget justification.
  • Results from Prior NSF Support Clarification: Language has been clarified to indicate “that if any PI or co-PI identified on the proposal has received an NSF award with an end date in the past five years or in the future (including
    any current funding and no cost extensions), information on the award is required for each PI and co-PI. This applies regardless of whether the support was directly related to the proposal or not” (NSF Proposal & Award Policy Newsletter).
  • Life Sciences Dual Use Research of Concern (DURC) New Language: The updated guidelines state that  “NSF will not consider funding research that would lead to a gain of function for agents of concern” (NSF Proposal & Award Policy Newsletter).
  • Final Project Report: Language has been updated to reflect that “when PIs submit the report, they are indicating that the scope of work is complete and no further administrative actions are anticipated on the grant” (NSF PAPPG).
  • Human Subjects: Language has been added on post award responsibilities. In particular, additional IRB approval must be obtained if protocol changes substantively from those proposed and approved in the grant application. NSF policy states, “When an additional IRB approval is required, the organization must provide to the cognizant NSF Program Officer a signed copy of the new IRB approval letter indicating approval of the covered activities and explicitly referencing the title of the award” (NSF Post Award Requirements and Considerations).

Sources: NSF PAPPG and Proposal & Award Policy Newsletter


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NSF Proposal Submission in Research.gov to Begin in April

Beginning in April 2018, proposers will be able to prepare and submit non-collaborative research proposals in Research.gov.  The initial release of this new capability will run in parallel with existing FastLane proposal preparation and submission capabilities, so proposers can choose to prepare and submit non-collaborative research proposals in Research.gov or in FastLane beginning in April. Separately submitted collaborative proposals must still be submitted in FastLane.

NSF will preview the new functionality to the research community in February 2018 to collect preliminary feedback and to provide the community an opportunity to acclimate to the new technology. Some of the new proposal preparation capabilities the community will be able to preview in February include page formatting compliance checks, project summary and project description heading compliance checks, and a completely redesigned display of the budget.

After deploying the new Research.gov functionality for non-collaborative research proposals, NSF plans to obtain user feedback from the initial release to implement enhancements and expand functionality incrementally, with the goal of eventually transitioning all proposal preparation and submission functionality from FastLane to
Research.gov.

Source: NSF Proposal & Award Policy Newsletter


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New Year, New Forms: Revised UWL Grant/Contract Transmittal and Post Award Modifications Forms 

Beginning January 1, significantly updated versions of two extramural funding forms (replacing four old forms) have taken effect.

What’s new?

New Grant/Contract Transmittal Form
  • This replaces two old forms: the UW System Grant Transmittal Form and the Grant/Contract Transmittal Form used for all other extramural funding. As with its predecessors, the form will be used to document the required institutional review and approval of all extramural funding (grants and sponsored research contracts), including UW System funding, prior to  proposal submission. The required signatures remain the same (PI and co-PIs, department chair(s)/unit director(s), dean(s)/division director(s), ORSP director).
New Post Award Modifications Form
  • This replaces two old forms: the Budget Modification Form and No-Cost Extension Form. The new form will document the required institutional review and approval of the following post award modifications:
    • Budget modifications when total funding previously awarded is reduced or increased, significant revisions are needed (i.e., those requiring prior approval from the sponsor), or funds are reallocated from participant support
    • No-cost extensions
    • Award transfers from or to another institution
    • Changes to a project’s PI, scope, objectives, or personnel effort
    • Other modifications requiring a sponsor’s prior approval
New Post Award Modifications Procedures Online
  • To clarify which post award modifications require prior approval, and the process for obtaining approval, significantly updated procedures have been published on the ORSP website. The procedures themselves are not new, but the (hopefully) clearer guidance is.

Why?

The replaced forms were first implemented over 15 years ago and have not been significantly updated since that time. The revisions ensure a) the forms, content, and processes are more comprehensible and uniform; and b) we are addressing the myriad compliance regulation revisions that have occurred over the past 1 1/2 decades.

While the forms have been updated, processes and requirements remain essentially the same. Please contact ORSP with any questions.

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Save the Dates for Grant Seeking Professional Development Webinars!

In spring 2018, WiSys Regional Research Administrator Jeremy Miner (UW-Eau Claire) will be hosting five professional development webinars for UW System faculty and staff. Topics will span the continuum of grant seeking expertise, addressing the needs of novice as well as seasoned grant applicants. Sessions are each targeted to be 75 minutes total, with 60 minutes of presentation and 15 minutes for Q&A.

Dates and topics are provided below. The webinars will be hosted by ORSP in the Institute for Campus Excellence (150 Murphy Library).

WiSys Spring 2018 Grant Webinar Series UW-La Crosse

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Recent Submissions


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Recent Awards

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UWL & UW System Grants

UWL Curricular Redesign Grants

Program contact: UWL Center for Advancing Teaching & Learning (CATL)

Program summary: Curricular Redesign Grants support groups of instructors to develop or redesign and implement curricula and teaching practices in academic programs. The program funds projects that involve significant revisions intended to address challenging learning goals, student learning problems, and/or achievement gaps. Priority will be given to projects that go above and beyond normal curriculum development, course updates, and minor revisions. Projects should include design, assessment, and further improvement of curriculum and teaching practices.

Deadline: March 5, 2018

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UWL Carol Dobrunz Endowment Fund

Program contact: Faculty Senate IAS Committee Chair (see the current Faculty Senate Committee Assignments)

Program summary: This fund supports conference costs for non-tenured faculty or instructional academic staff (IAS) without an indefinite appointment. The recipient must meet the following criteria: 1) must be employed at UWL with at least a 75 percent appointment; 2) must be either a non-tenured faculty member or a member of instructional academic staff without an indefinite appointment; 3) must be attending a national conference within their discipline; 4) may not have previously received this award.

Note: There will be significant program changes for the spring 2018 submission deadline. While the application forms and process will be changing, the eligible applicants and activities will remain the same.

Deadline: March 30, 2018

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UWL International Program Development Fund

Program contact: Rose Brougham (rbrougham@uwlax.edu)

Program summary: Through institutional partnerships and other scholarly activities, university faculty and academic staff are connected with other universities and organizations throughout the world. International experiences bring the world to the classroom, enhance research, and assist in preparing students, faculty, and staff in becoming global citizens for the 21st Century. The grant program focuses on the development of faculty- and staff-led programs (e.g., scoping visits) or faculty exchanges.

Deadline: February 5, 2018

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UWL International Scholarship Grant

Program contact: UWL Provost Office

Program summary: The program supports internationalization of the university through research and other scholarly projects that are international in scope and have the potential to transform the applicant’s research. One of the primary outcomes associated with this program is the support of travel costs to present research at international venues. However, UWL employees may submit proposals associated with conducting scholarly endeavors abroad and/or enhancing their professional development in a manner that maximizes the interaction between faculty/staff and the host culture/community. Proposals must be approved by the department and dean and demonstrate that the university will realize tangible benefits.

Deadline: February 5, 2018

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UWL Program Assessment Grant

Program contact: UWL Provost Office

Program summary: In an effort to support program assessment activities, this grant provides support for gathering, analyzing, discussing, and acting on evidence of student learning in programs. This program is intended to support evidence-informed improvement of teaching and learning in majors and concentrations. Awards may be used for expenses related to the development of assessment plans, collection of assessment data, or the review of assessment data and development of action steps based on results. No single course assessment proposals are eligible. The awards are for projects that will take place in the spring 2018 semester and be completed by June 1, 2018.

Deadline: February 16, 2018

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